Jenny Molloy

Applications are now open for GOSH 2018, the Gathering for Open Science Hardware, taking place over four consecutive days 10-13 October 2018 in Shenzhen, China. GOSH would like to invite you to apply to join another 100 active users, developers and thinkers in open hardware for science to benefit research, education, and science engagement.

GOSH is an ongoing meeting series designed to support a stronger and more collaborative community in open hardware for science. In 2016, we convened for the first time at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and then in Santiago, Chile for GOSH 2017. These meetings have led to the creation of the GOSH Manifesto and the Global Open Science Hardware Roadmap, a burgeoning community, and ongoing individual and organisational collaborations. In 2018, we will continue to explore the diversity of existing projects, share best practices, and identify needs with those engaged in making and using open hardware within research institutions and beyond. We’ll listen to user stories and developer journeys, host a series of workshops on topics such as sharing and licensing, design for manufacture and scaling.  

For more information and how to apply, please visit the Gathering for Open Science Hardware website.

The University of Cambridge is seeking a Co-ordinator for two Synthetic Biology research initiatives at the University of Cambridge. OpenPlant and the SynBio SRI both promote i) interdisciplinary research between engineering, physics, biology and social sciences; ii) development of open and open source technologies for biology including software, hardware and genetic tools; iii) responsible research and innovation. The successful candidate will have a PhD in a relevant field and knowledge of Synthetic Biology research, policy and practice. 

For details, please read the full job description.

By Jenny Molloy, University of Cambridge.

Introduction by Raniere Silva, Software Sustainability Institute.

Chris Anderson, in his book "Free: The Future of a Radical Price", explores the transformation on business imposed by the spread of cheap computation power and data transfer. This same factors changed how we do research. Pre-prints, data share, code share have more common than you’d think. Unfortunately, scientific hardware is still a barrier for many researchers who don't have access to the tools required for their investigation. We are very excited to share the “Gathering for Open Science Hardware's Roadmap”, originally published at openhardware.science, "for providing global access to scientific hardware by 2025 through open source designs, collaborative research and new manufacturing techniques, including 3D-printing."

The following text was first posted at the Gathering for…

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