Raniere Silva

Jupyter sprintBy Raniere Silva, Community Officer, Software Sustainability Institute

On 16-20th January, the International Centre for Mathematical Sciences hosted the Computational Mathematics with Jupyter workshop organised jointly by the OpenDreamKit and CoDiMa projects where GAP, Singular, SageMath, Jupyter users and developers met for experience sharing talks and coding hackathons.

In a previous blog post, we covered the talks during the Computational Mathematics with Jupyter workshop and in this post we will mention some of the achievements of the workshop attendees during the sprint. If you do a search on Wikipedia, "a sprint is a get-together of people involved in a project to further a focused development of the project", but at this sprint attendees worked on more than one project. Some people are sceptical about the value of sprints, but we hope that the Jupyter sprint helped…

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ICMStalksBy Raniere Silva, Software Sustainability Institute, Hans Fangohr, University of Southampton.

From the 16th to the 20th January, the International Centre for Mathematical Sciences  hosted the Computational Mathematics with Jupyter Workshop organised jointly by the OpenDreamKit and CoDiMa projects where GAP, Singular, SageMath, Jupyter users and developers met for experience sharing talks and coding hackathons.

The workshop kickstarted with Mike Croucher asking the provocative question "is your research software correct?" Mike covered the reproducibility crises that, in his own words, can be partially solved with:

  • Automation (aka learn to program)

  • Writing code in a (very) high-level language

  • Getting some training

  • Using version control

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By Raniere Silva, Community Officer.Laptop on the beach.

The first phase of Google Summer of Code 2017 launched on January 19th and by participating as an open source project or mentor you could help make this edition the best one so far. This is an opportunity to have that change to your IDE that you have dreamt of for months, remove the bottleneck in your data analysis pipeline or test a new idea by the end of August.

Google Summer of Code (GSoC) allows projects to download developers! We at the Institute think that it’s a great opportunity for those working with research software to be a part of the wider open source community either by mentoring students (who are paid by Google to work on open source projects during the summer) or by suggesting project ideas. The first phase of the programme is when mentoring organisations can apply to participate in GSoC: the deadline is February 9, 2017 17:00 (GMT). In this phase, mentoring organisations start to collect project ideas and identify mentors; in this post we will list some ways you can contribute to GSoC's.

I want to lead my project / organisation’s application

If you are part of an open source software project, or an organisation…

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Container ship.Twitter: #C4RR

The Software Sustainability Institute’s Docker Containers for Reproducible Research Workshop brings together researchers, developers and educators to explore best practices when using containers and the future of research software with containers. Docker Containers for Reproducible Research Workshop (C4RR) will take place from 27th to 28th June 2017 at Cambridge.

Register your interest

Register your interest to attend.

Containers

Containers, specially Docker, is the hottest topics at the moment for reproducible research. What impact does the use of containers have on research, how can researchers benefit from them and make their research more reproducible? The Software Sustainability Institute invites all members of the research software community to explore and discuss these and other questions at C4RR.

Containers refers to a server virtualisation method that is lighter than virtual machine what allows a quicker launch time for applications and more concurrent instances running on the same server. Researchers currently use Docker, one of the container implementations available on the market, to package the software used in their research so other, including their future self, can reproduce the computational environment used in an experiment. Another scenario where researchers are using Docker is when some software libraries aren't…

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Container ship.27th – 28th June, Cambridge (provisional date)

Containers, specially Docker, are the hottest topic at the moment for reproducible research. What impact does the use of containers have on research, how can researchers benefit from them and make their research more reproducible? The Software Sustainability Institute invites all members of the research software community to explore and discuss these and other questions at the Docker Containers for Reproducible Research Workshop from 27th to 28th June 2017 (date tbc) at Cambridge.

The Software Sustainability Institute’s Docker Containers for Reproducible Research Workshop will bring together researchers, developers, innovators and educators to explore best practices when using containers and the future of research software with containers. C4RR aims to gain insight into the topics of containers technologies and how these impact and will impact on research. It is also an ideal opportunity to form collaborations.

For further information and register interest, please visit the Docker Containers for Reproducible Research Workshop page.

GitLabby Raniere Silva, Software Sustainability Institute.

In September, when I got an email from GitLab inviting me to their World Tour I got super excited at the opportunity to meet some of the people behind GitLab and more users as well as discovering features available that I’ve never tried before and new improvements that will be enabled on the next release. In the end, not only did I find new features but also talked with one of the responsible for GitLab University: an online "place to learn about Version Control with Git and GitLab" and have a great time with other users.

GitLab World Tour London happened on October 19th at Lights of SOHO, London. The event was scheduled to start at 6:00pm and 10 minutes before the time there was already a small queue on the door, which created the feeling of a very important world tour. While I was queueing, I talked to two software developers that had come all their way from Brno, Czech Republic. It was a great surprise to me since I was only expecting to meet with users based in the UK, mostly London. They had started using GitLab a few months ago and were attending the meeting for the same reasons I was there!

The show started with Amanda…

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GSOC blogBy Raniere Silva, Software Sustainability Institute, David Pérez-Suárez, University College London.

The Google Summer of Code (GSoC) is a programme run by Google to sponsor the development of open source projects by university students between June and August (see our previous post Downloading Developers: The Google Summer of Code). After the summer, Google sponsors some GSoC mentors to meet in Sunnyvale, California, for a two-day summit where they can discuss what went well and what can be improved.

When we discovered that we would attend the summit (Raniere represented NumFOCUS and David represented Open Astronomy), we were happy to know in advance that a familiar face would be present. The summit kicked-off on a Friday.  Mentors arrived in their respective hotels with their many (figurative) hats—not all attendees make their living from their projects (we don't). The summit followed the unconference style and its schedule for the next two days started to take form the same Friday night. To propose a session, participants needed to write their…

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MentoringBy Raniere Silva, Software Sustainability Institute, David Pérez-Suárez, University College London, Stian Soiland-Reyes, University of Manchester.

Ian Holmes said on Twitter:

"You can download our code from the URL supplied. Good luck downloading the only postdoc who can get it to run, though".

Ian's quote raises awareness that those working on research software need to use best practices, such as version control, testing and documentation, in their daily work because otherwise, other researchers, developers or even the authors themselves will have difficulty getting hold of the software or making it work. Keeping software effort in your research project for a long period of time can be challenging, especially if you don't have access to a big budget; this is also true for many open source projects.

To help the open source ecosystem, Google has a programme called Google Summer…

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Square at Erlangen.by Raniere Silva, Software Sustainability Institute.

When EuroSciPy 2016 was announced, I told to myself that I need to attend it. The first reason was to compare it with SciPy Latin America 2016, whose organisation I helped with last March, and be able to provide suggestions to both events in 2017.

Both conferences are about the use of Python in science and received between 100 and 200 attendees from different countries. SciPy Latin America 2016 attendees complained about the four tutorial parallel track and I believe that, for a conference of this size, having only beginner and intermediate tutorial tracks, as done by EuroSciPy, is the right choice. EuroSciPy had the last day reserved for sprints, something that was cut from SciPy Latin America—and that can be improved if the organizers provide an agenda for it. SciPy Latin America had some swags for the attendees that I really missed on EuroSciPy.

Another reason that I wanted to attend EuroScipy 2016 was to promote the Software Sustainability Institute, Software Carpentry and Data Carpentry. I taught a Git Tutorial based on Software Carpentry material on the second day. The organisers told me that they received positive comments about the Git Tutorial—which made me happy! EuroSciPy also had some lightning talk…

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Research Data Visualisation WorkshopBy Raniere Silva, Community Officer, Olivia Guest, University of Oxford, Vincent Knight,Cardiff University, Christina Bergmann, Ecole Normale Supérieure.

The Institute’s Research Data Visualisation Workshop took place on the 28th of July 2016 at the University of Manchester. Raniere Silva’s warm welcome was followed by Prof. Jessie Kennedy’s, from the Institute for Informatics and Digital Innovation at Edinburgh Napier University, keynote talk. Jessie spoke about the miscommunication of data due to poor visualisation techniques and how to avoid it. With over 50 attendees, the workshop provided an environment for learning and sharing. In the following sections, we will cover the events that took place during the workshop.

The Keynote

RDVW keynote

The Research Data Visualisation keynote talk was titled: ‘…

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