Software and research: the Institute's Blog

ToolsBy Shoaib Sufi, Community Lead

People are often interested not only in our events but also how we organise them.  For CW17, we used a number of platforms to make things happen. This is a brief description for more details and if you are interested in running your own, then please get in touch.

For registration, we used the Eventbrite system. This allowed us to control the questions we ask at registration, any access codes, a waiting list and emailing the attendees. It’s all free for free events so there’s a chance to test out its features.

For the pre-registration, collecting feedback, and planning stages, as well as, storing photos, we used Google Drive and associated apps.

To automate the creation of templates and indexes to support the speed blogging and the Collaborative ideas and Hackday ideas session, we wrote custom Google App Scripts to support the pipeline of template requests, templates, indexes and permission. Source code and instructions will be added here once available.

At the Collaborations Workshop 2017, we used a Slack and a specific Slack Team…

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Collaborations Workshop 2017 in LeedsBy Selina Aragon, Communications Officer, and Shoaib Sufi, Community Lead

The Software Sustainability Institute community team invites everyone to read the Collaborations Workshop 2017 report detailing each session’s content and the value provided to the attendees. CW17 took place at the Leeds Business School, University of Leeds, from 27th to 29th March 2017. The theme was the Internet of Things and Open Data: implications for research.

Read the full report.

How people rated CW17

This year we asked attendees to rate CW17 compared to the events they had attended in the past 12 months. 70% of those responding who were not staff and who had attended four or more events in the previous 12 months said that CW17 was the best or second best event they’d attended (over 50% said it was the best).

On average, attendees met ten new people at CW17 and, at the time, they intended to start two new collaborations. During the opening of the workshop, participants were encouraged to speak to at least seven people they didn't know. As usual, people found the workshop both enjoyable (4.6/5) and useful (4.3/5). 80 people attended the workshop and 30 filled in the…

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Learning programming for non-programmersBy Thomas Etherington, Senior Research Leader, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and Institute Fellow.

One of the Software Sustainability Institute’s missions is to increase programming skills through training. So as part of my Software Sustainability Institute Fellowship, and with support from the Royal Geographical Society, I am organising an introductory programming workshop targeted at geographers. However, as well as telling people what they need to know from the perspective of someone with programming skills, I also think it is important to understand how learning computer programming is viewed from the non-programmer's perspective so that the training can be made as effective as possible. Therefore, the application process for attending the workshop involved a survey that asked non-programmers questions about their perceptions of computer programming.  I’ve summarised here what I think are some interestingly consistent themes and how these will affect the design of my workshop.

I had a total of 18 applicants for the workshop, the majority of whom had interests in human geography, so the following does need…

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Computational NeuroscienceBy Stephen Eglen, University of Cambridge.

The annual Computational Neuroscience meeting was held this July in Antwerp, Belgium. This is a well-established meeting for researchers to discuss matters around computational modelling and analysis of neuronal systems. Although computational simulation and analysis is at the heart of this field, historically there has been little evidence of sharing of code. I was pleasantly surprised, however, to discover at the meeting that many leading labs now embrace open science. Below I outline my key observations based on observing and presenting at two workshops.

Workshop 1: Recent methods and analyses for neuronal population recordings

Recent technological developments mean that it is now possible to record the spiking activity of many hundreds or thousands of neurons simultaneously. This workshop described some of these recent techniques and the challenges for data analysis. Two themes of general interest emerged in my view from the first day:

  1. People are now sharing their computational methods; most speakers at the workshop already made…

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Berlin summer schoolBy Ben Marwick, University of Washington and University of Wollongong.

Recently we concluded the 2017 Summer School on Reproducible Research in Landscape Archaeology at the Freie Universität Berlin (17th–21th July), funded and jointly organised by Exc264 Topoi, CRC1266, and ISAAKiel. With a group of 15 archaeologists and geographers from Berlin, Kiel and Cologne, we spent a week learning advanced geostatistics and how to make our research more reproducible.

Reproducibility is a relatively new concept for archaeology; it has only recently received some attention, and so we encountered many challenges in teaching and learning this unfamiliar subject. The general idea is that a piece of research, such as a publication, should contain enough information for another researcher to reproduce the results in that paper. In former times, when archaeology was simpler than today, this was relatively straightforward. However, that is not the case nowadays, with computers and complex software and algorithms…

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