Software and research: the Institute's Blog

Building communities to support Research Software Engineering: blog series 2/3

Latest version published on 10 May, 2018.

By Anna Krystalli, University of Sheffield, and Toby Hodges, EMBL Bio-IT

Building communities to support Research Software Engineering: blog series 1/3

Latest version published on 10 May, 2018.

By Anna Krystalli, University of Sheffield, and Toby Hodges, EMBL Bio-IT

Computational Physics Group (CPG) of the Institute of Physics (IoP)

Latest version published on 2 May, 2018.

By Anton Shterenlikht, Bristol University

Some takeaways from Git Merge 2018

Latest version published on 1 May, 2018.

By Matthew Upson, Freelance Data Scientist.

Brexit Data Challenge event

Latest version published on 1 May, 2018.

By Reka Solymosi, University of Manchester.

Sharing data & code for reproducible neuroimaging

Latest version published on 13 April, 2018.

By Cyril Pernet, University of Edinburgh.

This blog post was first published at neurostatscyrilpernet.blogspot.co.uk.

The secret behind the growth of RSE Groups in the UK

Latest version published on 9 July, 2018.

When I first started thinking about how we could create a career path for Research Software Engineers (RSEs) in academia, I assumed we would have to persuade university management to change their policies and make it possible, or at least much easier, for researchers to retain RSEs within their groups. The actual solution has been somewhat different, and much more effective.

Open Data Day Cambridge

Latest version published on 10 April, 2018.

What is Reproducible Research Oxford?

Latest version published on 6 April, 2018.

By Laura Fortunato, University of Oxford

How to onboard yourself into an unfamiliar domain

Latest version published on 6 April, 2018.

By Matt Archer, Paul Brown, Stephen Dowsland, David Mawdsley, Amy Krause, Mark Turner (order is alphabetical).

So… you’ve just started on an exciting new data science project, but you know nothing about the domain you’re working on. Besides briefly panicking, how do you get up to speed on the area you’re working on?