Aleksandra Nenadic

carpentrycon2018Registrations are now open for CarpentryCon 2018 in Dublin. The event will take place from 30th May to 1st June 2018. 

CarpentryCon 2018 is the key networking and community building event in the Software and Data Carpentries' (now The Carpentries') annual calendar. This three-day event will help develop the next generation of research leaders by providing practical skill-ups, networking, workshops and all kinds of discussions.

The Carpentries have announced that the first CarpentryCon will take place from 30 May-1 June 2018 at the University College Dublin, Ireland.

CarpentryCon aspires to become a major learning, skill-building and networking event for the global Carpentries community. CarpentryCon 2018 will focus on three main themes:

  • community building,
  • sharing knowledge and
  • networking.

More details about CarpentryCon 2018 can be found from the official Carpentries announcement.

The Software Sustainability Institute is organising Carpentry Instructor Training workshop at the University of Manchester from 4th to 5th September 2017, just before WSSSPE5.1 and RSE 2017—making it a nice week in Manchester.

The Instructor Training is an intensive two-day workshop for trainers who wish to become Software Carpentry and Data Carpentry instructors. It is strongly recommended that attendees have some previous exposure to Data and/or Software Carpentry workshops, either as students, helpers, observers or co-instructors.

The event is sold out at the moment, but you can still join the waiting list.

 

The Institute is helping organise and run a Software Carpentry taster on 18 May 2017 at Digital Humanities @ Manchester Digital Texts workshops.

Together with our colleagues from Research IT, University of Manchester, and University of Sheffield Library, we are running a half-day introduction to the command line and automating tasks for the digital humanities based on the Software and Library Carpentry's shell lesson.

The Carpentry session will take place on the morning of day one of a two-day event comprising of three mini workshops on 18th & 19th May at the School of Digital Humanities in Manchester.

Registration is free and there are still places available.

For other workshops at the same event—run by Pip Willcox, Head of the Centre for Digital Scholarship at the Bodleian Libraries in Oxford—, see:

Old map of the worldBy Aleksandra Nenadic, Training Lead

Say you've got a Google spreadsheet with a column for addresses. It could be street addresses or postcodes. You want to map this data and embed the map into a website. Maybe you also want the map to update dynamically as more rows are added to the spreadsheet. What are your options?

This guide goes through the different ways to do this. However, to first map the data you’ll need to find the geocodes; i.e., latitude and longitude coordinates for these addresses. For locations that are more general, such as “UK”, geocoding APIs usually return the coordinates of the centroid—the area’s center point—or the capital.

Using Google My Maps

Google My Maps is a powerful tool designed to easily create custom maps from your data and share and publish maps online. You don’t need to worry about geocodes—they will be calculated for you out of addresses and postcodes.

To use this tool, you’ll need a Google account and you can either load data from a CSV, XSLX, KML or GPX file or link your Google spreadsheet (making sure it is either publicly available via "File" > "Publish to the web..." option in Google Spreadsheets or you have created a special sharing link for it).

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Centres for Doctoral Training (CDTs), also called Doctoral Training Centres (DTCs), are one of the several ways by which research councils in the UK provide support for advanced, high-level and increasingly interdisciplinary scientific training following undergraduate studies.

Some of the CDTs may require training in basic software development skills in order to help scientists improve or speed up their research, ensure that their results are more reliable and verifiable, encourage sharing code and collaboration with others and aid reproducibility overall. For this reason, the Institute was interested in finding out the details of CDTs (supported by our funding organisations and close collaborators - EPSRS, BBSRC, ESRC, NERC and AHRC), including:

  • their training strategy
  • how many students are in their cohorts each year
  • when did the first cohort start and when will the last cohort start
  • how are they spread geographically

As the Institute already has multi-year training agreements with some CDTs relating to running and coordinating Software Carpentry (SWC) and Data Carpentry (DC) workshops, we were also interested to identify other such centres, as they were likely to be interested in either helping with setting up regional training centres or setting up their own software training.

The task of collecting details of CDTs was made easier by using information available in RCUK’s Gateway to Research, a website which provides information relating to publicly-funded research and training projects (and APIs to access that information programatically). Only a few adjustments had to be done manually (for missing, newly-announced centres) by looking directly on…

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The Software Sustainability Institute, ELIXIR UK and the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Oxford are jointly organising a Bioinformatics Software Carpentry workshop in NGS data analysis. 

The workshop will be held at the Medical Sciences Teaching Center (MSTC) over 3 days, 5th-7th December 2016. The first two days will cover the standard Software Carpentry curriculum (introduction to the UNIX shell, GitHub as well as programming and data visualisation in R). The third day will involve hands-on next generation sequencing (NGS) data analysis in R. The aim is to make the course accessible to beginners, however some prior bioinformatics knowledge/skills will be an advantage. 

Please visit the workshop page for further information. The workshop is completely booked. However, if you are interested in attending, please get in touch with Aleksandra Nenadic in the case there are some cancellations and late availability.

Library CarpentryWhat is Library Carpentry?

Library Carpentry introduces librarians to the fundamentals of computing and provides them with a platform for further self-directed learning, based on similar initiatives Software Carpentry and Data Carpentry.

Library Carpentry is made by librarians, for librarians to help them:

  • automate repetitive, boring, error-prone tasks

  • create, maintain and analyse sustainable and reusable data

  • work effectively with IT and systems colleagues

  • better understand the use of software in research

  • and much more…

How it started?

Library Carpentry was started by James Baker, Software Sustainability Institute Fellow 2015. James used his Fellowship funds to launch initial Library Carpentry workshops, which attracted 59 participants from 14 institutions in London and reached 200-250 librarians. Since then, a number of workshops have run in various countries across four continents.

Find out more about the Library Carpentry activities.

 

There are still some places left at the Data Carpentry for Social Scientists and Humanities workshop organised by the SSI Fellow 2016 Heather Ford at the University of Leeds on 21-22 November 2016. 

This two-day event is aimed at researchers in the social sciences, humanities and other disciplines who want to learn how to use popular tools for data cleaning, management and visualisation in a hands-on, interactive workshop. 

Image by CASTLE ROCK INNOVATIONS.By David Perez-Suarez, University College London, Phil Bradbury, University of Manchester, Aleksandra Nenadic, University of Manchester, Laurent Gatto, Cambridge University, and Niall Beard, University of Manchester.

A speed blog from the Collaborations Workshop 2016 (CW16).

Remote collaboration: challenges in Human-Computer-Human interactions.

Tools that were mentioned during the discussion: GitHub, BitBucket, GitHub issue tracker, Skype, Google Hangouts (but max participants in Skype/Google Hangouts), Google Docs, spreadsheets, Jira, todo lists, time sheets, DropBox, … but are tools really the problem?

Use cases: coding, remote teaching, writing papers, large open-source development.

We started our discussion with a list of tools and use cases from our own experience: GitHub, BitBucket, GitHub issue tracker, Skype, Google Hangouts (but max participants in Skype/Google Hangouts), Google Docs, spreadsheets, Jira, todo lists, time sheets, DropBox, … for situations like coding, remote teaching, writing papers, large open-source development. Despite the availability of these tools, some being really good, we were left to wonder whether the tools were really the problem, here?

How is the Team…

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