Martin Donnelly

3857596_b61f5c8d78_z.jpgBy Sammie Buzzard, University College London; Martin Donnelly, University of Edinburgh.

Introduction or why does this matter?

Whether our involvement in software is in developing it from scratch, building upon existing code, reusing or repurposing someone else’s work, or preserving it (for ten years or until the end of the world, whichever comes first), good software practices benefit us all. This could range from basic version control for an undergraduate’s first coding project to passing well-documented software from one research project to its successor, but the best way to motivate people to improve their practices will be highly dependent on the individual and their circumstances and drivers.

Additionally, appealing to the individual is effective but it doesn’t scale—there are simply too many people involved in research software for a small community of advocates to reach on an individual basis. There are also more wide-ranging actions that could be taken, for example by journals and funding bodies, that could catalyse change within the research software community as a whole. Like any bridge, it is  a good idea to start building from both ends...

So what can we do at an individual level?

In common with most other…

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Martin DonnellyUniversity of Edinburgh

My work

Martin's academic background is in English Literature and Information Technology, and before joining the University of Edinburgh he was Technology Assessor and Tutor/Lecturer at the Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute (HATII) at the University of Glasgow.

His main curation focus is on data management planning and policy. He wrote an early book chapter on data management planning in 2012 (Pryor ed., Managing Research Data, London: Facet), and was co-author of the DCC's original "Checklist for a Data Management Plan". He conceived and project managed the first three iterations of the DMPonline data management planning tool, and has presented about this in the UK, the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and various European countries. He also represents the DCC's Edinburgh contingent on the EC-funded FOSTER project, and coordinates the DCC's consultancy activities.

Externally, Martin currently serves as an external expert reviewer for European Commission Data Management Plans, and sits on the Digital Preservation Coalition's Communications and Advocacy sub-committee. He was previously a founder member of the steering group of the US DMPTool, sat on the Databib's Advisory Board (since merged with re3data), and acted as Secretary to the UK CODATA national committee.

An erstwhile HE administrator, Martin has also served as Policy Officer at the University of Glasgow and as Quality Officer (Strategic Development) at Edinburgh College…

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