Archaeology

By Ben Marwick, University of Washington and University of Wollongong.

We are working with the RTI-VIPS project to simplify the deployment process for their Reflectance Transformation Imaging software, packaging these complex components into an installer designed for use by researchers

By Ben Marwick, Assistant Professor of Archaeology at the University of Washington.

This short post is written for archaeologists who frequently perform common data analysis and visualisation tasks in Excel, SPSS or similar commercial packages. It was motivated by my recent observations at the Society of American Archaeology meeting in San Francisco - the largest annual meeting of archaeologists in the world - where I noticed that the great majority of archaeologists use Excel and SPSS. I wrote this post to describe why those packages might not be the best choices, and…

By Kristian Strutt, Experimental Officer at the University of Southampton, and Dean Goodman, Geophysicist at the Geophysical Archaeometry Laboratory, UC Santa Barbara.

This article is part of our series: a day in the software life, in which we ask researchers from all disciplines to discuss the tools that make their research possible.

Archaeological practice in the field seems so down to earth. The daily routine of excavation, recording of stratigraphy, finds and contexts, and understanding the different formation processes – it is what we are,…

By Adi Keinan-Schoonbaert, Research Associate, UCL Institute of Archaeology, and Daniel Pett, ICT Advisor, British Museum.

This article is part of our series: a day in the software life, in which we ask researchers from all disciplines to discuss the tools that make their research possible.

With the archaeology, heritage and museum sectors suffering from substantial budget cuts in recent years, there has been a need to find creative ways to generate income and keep our heads above water. Online crowdfunding is a relatively new way to raise funds…

By Andrew Bevan, Senior Lecturer, UCL Institute of Archaeology.

This article is part of our series: a day in the software life, in which we ask researchers from all disciplines to discuss the tools that make their research possible.

Archaeologists have long had a taste for computer-based methods, not least because of their need to organise large datasets of sites and finds, search for statistical patterns and map out the results geographically. Digital technologies have been important in fieldwork for at least two decades and increasingly important for sharing…

By Beatrice Demarchi, Research Fellow at the Department of Archaeology, and Dr Julie Wilson, Lecturer at the Department of Chemistry. University of York.

This article is part of our series: a day in the software life, in which we ask researchers from all disciplines to discuss the tools that make their research possible.

Interdisciplinary research between fields as diverse as biochemistry, physics and archaeology can help us decipher the most amazing things, for example the choices that our ancestors made thousands of years ago when deciding how to adorn their dead…

By Peter Rauxloh, Director of Technology Services at Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA).

This article is part of our series: a day in the software life, in which we ask researchers from all disciplines to discuss the tools that make their research possible.

In 1746, John Roque, a French Huguenot émigré ​and enthusiastic surveyor for hire, published his iconic map of London. It is a valuable representation of London at the time, and is now the focus of…

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