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Apache Software FoundationApache Software Foundation's David Nalley will be presenting the webinar, "The Risk of the Commons," on September 26th at 11am (EDT). 

Please register here. Be sure to check spam/junk folder for registration confirmation with attached calendar file.

Open Source, as a development methodology, has revolutionised how we innovate, how we develop, and how we consume software. Any cutting edge technology software is presumed to be open source. So what does software methodology have to learn from 19th century economics of farming? Unfortunately quite a lot. While the open source methodology allows tremendous speed in the rate of innovation; but all too frequently we consume without any idea of how well software is maintained. This has led us to unhappy situations where we find that the most heavily used encryption library in the world, was maintained by 4 people, in their spare time. Or the incredibly important GPG suite of tools - was maintained by two people, one of whom was an intern. Of course these aren't new problems, but how do we solve them without experiencing a tragedy of the commons.

More information about this presentation and speaker bio are on the event page…

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Square at Erlangen.by Raniere Silva, Software Sustainability Institute.

When EuroSciPy 2016 was announced, I told to myself that I need to attend it. The first reason was to compare it with SciPy Latin America 2016, whose organisation I helped with last March, and be able to provide suggestions to both events in 2017.

Both conferences are about the use of Python in science and received between 100 and 200 attendees from different countries. SciPy Latin America 2016 attendees complained about the four tutorial parallel track and I believe that, for a conference of this size, having only beginner and intermediate tutorial tracks, as done by EuroSciPy, is the right choice. EuroSciPy had the last day reserved for sprints, something that was cut from SciPy Latin America—and that can be improved if the organizers provide an agenda for it. SciPy Latin America had some swags for the attendees that I really missed on EuroSciPy.

Another reason that I wanted to attend EuroScipy 2016 was to promote the Software Sustainability Institute, Software Carpentry and Data Carpentry. I taught a Git Tutorial based on Software Carpentry material on the second day. The organisers told me that they received positive comments about the Git Tutorial—which made me happy! EuroSciPy also had some lightning talk…

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Originally from Brazil, Raniere graduated with a BSc in Applied Mathematics from the University of Campinas before joining the Software Sustainability Institute in February 2016, where he contributes with the Institute's community engagement activities.

As part of his undergraduate degree, Raniere did some research on linear programming and interior point methods. In Brazil, he worked as a freelance software developer using Python, Javascript and Julia.

In 2013, he joined Software Carpentry, and he became an organiser, teacher and consultant for all in Brazil. He has been a member of the Software Carpentry Steering Committee since 2015.

Read posts on this website by Raniere.

Research Fellow, Geography & Environment, University of Southampton

Interests

Satellite imaging; Geographic Information Systems; Air pollution; Open-source geographic software; Reproducible research; Software citation

Research

I am currently a research fellow at the University of Southampton, where my main work is developing new methods to monitor air pollution (specifically PM2.5) from satellite data. My other research activities sit alongside this, either focusing on new methods for quantitatively processing satellite data to produce useful information, or contributing further to research on air pollution and its effects.  Alongside this, I am working with the Flowminder Foundation on the use of mobile phone data to understand human mobility, and I led their response to the Nepal earthquake.

My background is a mixture of geography and computing: I did a pre-university gap year writing software to control nuclear power stations (yes, really!), an undergraduate degree in Geography, followed by a PhD in Complex Systems Simulation & Geography.

All of my work is carried out computationally, and can involve processing data ranging from a tiny CSV file to a stack of many 20Gb satellite images. I write most of my code in Python, but will use whatever language is necessary for the job - and have written relatively-large code bases in R, C++ and the .NET framework…

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Director, CORES Science and Engineering Limited

Interests

Earth observation of snow and soil moisture, snow physics, snow crystal growth, melt and freeze processes, effect of vegetation on snow, soil water flow, microwave remote sensing, microwave emission models, data assimilation, land surface heterogeneity and hydrology.

Research

Snow is an important part of the water cycle, with over 1 billion people dependent on melt for their water supply. However, we know very little about the global distribution of snow, nor whether it has changed over time. Current methods of estimating snow mass from satellite observations use techniques from the late 1980s, have some poor assumptions behind them, and consequently large errors associated with the measurements. My research aims are to develop algorithms to improve global snow mass and soil moisture estimates from satellite data at microwave wavelengths. This should lead to better water management and risk assessment for flooding and drought conditions.

Scattering of electromagnetic radiation is hugely sensitive to the size of the snow crystals, so we need to know this well in order to retrieve snow mass from the satellite data. Near-infrared reflectance, and physically-based models of the snow will give us an idea of how large the snow crystals are, to help with snow mass retrievals. Remote sensing of the soil moisture detects water content of the top few centimetres of soil, so we need to use computer simulations of water movement…

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Freelance Software Developer

Interests

I’m interested in using data to tell new kinds of stories. My areas of interest include open data, civic hacking and transparency, online mapping, JavaScript frameworks, NoSQL, data journalism and data visualisation.

You can see examples of my work at http://anna.ps.

Research

I’m a freelance developer, working mostly in JavaScript and Python. In my professional life I work with startups, corporates and non-profits on front- and back-end web development and data visualisation.

I became interested in software for research after creating Open Domesday http://domesdaymap.co.uk, the first free online copy of Domesday Book. I built Open Domesday in my spare time, using data created by the University of Hull - my goal was to create an accessible, attractive, and free version of Domesday Book.

Working with Professor John Palmer, who created the original data, the project has been able to release the dataset and high-quality images of Domesday under a Creative Commons licence, and create an API that is used by the British Museum and others.

I’ve created several other applications using datasets, such as England & Wales Baby Names http://names.darkgreener.com. This is a popular interactive visualisation and search tool for baby names, based on Office of National Statistics data, that was widely covered in the media.…

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Senior Lecturer; Institute for Teaching, Innovation and Learning; University of West London

Interests

My interests are Teaching and Retention.

Research

I used my 2013 SSI fellowship to explore the potential for computational approaches in sociology and anthropology. Since then I've moved into a new role focused on student retention, but I'm still in regular contact with a number of fellows and I'm still interested in computational approaches to investigating social science (and now administrative!) problems.

Online Presence 

Check out contributions by and mentions of Nick Pearce on www.software.ac.uk

Post-doctoral Research Fellow, School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University

Interests

Volcanology and experimental petrology, experimentally recreating volcanic systems to understand deep magmatic processes and volcanic plumbing systems, active volcano monitoring

Research

I study volcanoes from the inside out. Using high-pressure and high-temperature instrumentation in the laboratory, my research focuses on understanding the deep volcanic processes that are the origins of the volcanic activity we see on the earth's surface. A better understanding of these dynamic geochemical processes helps us to understand how volcanoes work -- the chemistry of their lavas, the composition of the gasses they release into the atmosphere, the impacts of eruptions on local and global populations, and what makes them erupt in the first place. By combining lab-constrained geochemical data with in situ measurements of real, active volcanoes, we can better understand the impacts of volcanoes on our world in the past, present, and future. Making the link between surface and subsurface means we can better interpret data from active volcano monitoring in order to understand what our observations tell us about concurrent volcanic activity. I use sustainable research software to combine data from different sources and analyze measurements taken at active volcanoes and in the lab.

Online Presence

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Lecturer, Department of Computer Science, Brunel University Londonderek-groen.jpg

Interests

I am interested in simulations of blood flow, refugee movements, materials, and star clusters. I also focus on multiscale computing, high-performance computing, and distributed computing.

Research

I am a Lecturer in Simulation and Modelling and I use and investigate large scale simulations in high-performance computing environments. In doing so, I look for generalized ways to make large scale simulations simpler, more relevant, more flexible and more efficient. I have a particular preference for multiscale or multi-model simulations, where effective combination of existing codes is the method of choice for addressing new science questions.

I am responsible for improving and maintaining the FabSim automation toolkit and the MPWide communication library, which we have used to couple different simulation codes and to parallelize simulations across multiple supercomputers. I worked on MUSCLE 2; a toolkit designed to provide structured code coupling based on a formalized multiscale modelling framework. 

I am working with a wide range of applications, including methods such as lattice-Boltzmann, stellar and cosmological N-body, agent-based simulations of refugees and molecular dynamics. I finished my PhD in 2010, where I ran large cosmological simulations geographically distributed across up to…

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Senior Research Associate, Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge

Interests

I use statistics and machine learning to uncover relevant patterns in high throughput biology data and make every effort to make my research outputs (papers, software and data) open to everyone to read and re-use.

Research

In biology, localisation is function: knowledge of the sub-cellular localisation of proteins is of paramount importance to assess and study their function and refine our understanding of cellular processes. Spatial or organelle proteomics is the systematic study of proteins and their sub-cellular localisation. My work is focused on the analysis of multivariate quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics data to infer sub-cellular localisation of proteins using contemporary and novel machine learning approaches. This research is implemented in a set of open source R/Bioconductor packages such as MSnbase and pRoloc. The software suite allows researcher to manage data, meta data and sub-cellular marker sets, apply state-of-the-art machine learning techniques to predict protein-organelle associations and incorporate data from other organelle proteomics initiatives and biological repositories. Particular emphasis is placed on reproducibility of the analyses, rigorous data exploration, comprehension of the data and the analysis pipeline, leading to a sound understanding of the data and informed interpretation of the results.

I am an affiliated member of the Bioconductor…

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