Hackdays

On the Hackday everyone win something but we had special prizes for members of the teams that better matched our criteria.

Prize winners groups

On Collaborations Workshop 2017 we gave an full size Amazon Echo as first prize and Raspberry Pi 3 kits plus sensor packs as second prize for each member of the winner group.

Team leaders are in bold.

Winning group: Munroe Meter for jargon scoring

CW17 Hackday Winners

Source codeslides, video.

Team members from left to right:

  • Emma Tattershall
  • Mateusz Kuzak
  • Jonathan Cooper
  • Eilis Hannon
  • Raniere Silva
  • Andrew Hufton

Runners up: One Click Best Practice

CW17 Hackday Runners up

Demosource code,

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The Computational Semantics Hackathon provides an opportunity to discuss and develop tools that are used in Computational Semantics. The event can be of interest for researchers, developers, students and users of semantic NLP tools. It can also be interesting for anyone working in the area of data processing tools.

Computational Semantics Hackathon, will take place on 11-12 April 2015 at the Queen Mary University of London Mile End Campus and will be co-located with the 11th International Conference on Computational Semantics (IWCS 2015).

More details and registration.

By Steve Crouch, Research Software Group Leader, and Mark Basham, SSI Fellow and Senior Software Scientist at Diamond Light Source.

January 30th 2015 saw the latest Institute-sponsored Hackathon at Diamond Light Source, bringing together top coding talent from across the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and beyond.

Participants were able to propose interesting scientific and software development projects related to Python, and work on them in groups. One constraint, however, was that these groups be formed of individuals that don't normally work together, and this led to some surprising results.

Run as part of their Python community of practice events, the Diamond Hackathon attracted 30 scientists, researchers and engineers from ISIS, the Central Laser Facility and Diamond on the Harwell Campus, and also from the Culham Centre for Fusion Energy. Inspired by the Institute’s Collaboration Workshops, the event allowed attendees to submit ideas for projects before the event and vote on the best ones early on in the day.

This diverse set of participants, together with a healthy…

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By Derek Groen, Research Associate at University College London.

This September, Joanna Lewis and I organised a Paper Hackathon event in Flore, Northamptonshire, with support from both the Software Sustainability Institute and 2020 Science.

Our highly ambitious goal was to write a scientific draft paper over the course of two and a half days within a highly informal setting. Did we manage to accomplish that? In many of the projects we did!

The projects

In the end we ended up accepting five proposed Hackathon projects (see the Appendix for their original descriptions) and rejecting two projects. Two weeks before the event, we already distributed the 21 participants among the five project teams, which were:

  • Project #1 - A software reproducibility investigation. Led by Joanna Lewis, proposed by Jonathan Cooper.
  • Project #2 - A comparison of code development approaches and techniques in academia. Led by James Osborne and Derek Groen, proposed by James Osborne.
  • Project #3 - A study of animal/cell dispersal. Led and proposed by Maria Bruna.
  • Project #4 - A protocol paper on Bayesian inference of animal receptor models. Led and proposed by Ben Calderhead and Zhuoyi Song.
  • Project #5 – A lattice-Boltzmann solver written in JULIA. Led by Mayeul D…
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The deadline for submissions to the Reproducible Science Hackathon, which takes place on December 8th-11th 2014 at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, North Carolina, is now only four days away.

The four day interdisciplinary workshop will teach attendees how to use both the tools and resources they will need to practice reproducible science. This means experiments and research can not only be repeated but built upon by both the original researcher and others.

Surprisingly, such skills are not often taught and so the Hackathon will provide an excellent opportunity for attendees to review their existing approach to research and also undergo further training. It will also dedicate half of its time to address and resolve challenges and obstacles that have so far hindered a wider take-up of sustainability in the field.

If you would like to attend, the deadline for applications is Friday October 10th 2014, and successful applicants will be informed by October 17th. Support with travel costs is available and the organisers especially encourage women and minority attendees to apply.

 

The Research Software Engineers hackday (16 September 2014) will focus on the use of activity monitors to assess, understand and maybe even diagnose mental health issues. To do this, we need activity monitors to collect data and to use on on the day. We're very happy to announce that Fitbit have come to our aid and provided 10 Fitbit Flex for the hackday!

Rae Lovejoy, Digital Marketing Manager EMEA from Fitbit UK, said "We’d like to wish everyone the best of luck for the Hack Day. We’re thrilled that we were able to support the Research Software Engineer campaign. We can't wait to hear about how many steps the Fitbit Flex record during the research period!"

Now we need to set about collecting some data. One suggestion is that everyone on the RSE committee wear a Fitbit for the week up to the hackday. Not only will this provide data for the hackday, it will also allow attendees at the hackday to find out which committee member is the laziest!

 

The Research Software Engineers community was founded to support the people who develop software used in research. If you want be a part of the community, come to our AGM and hackday which takes place on 15-16 September at King’s College London. It’s a free event thanks to our sponsor Maudsley Digital (no11WW).

Back in March 2012, we began raising awareness of the research community’s reliance on RSEs. In the last last year, we have made excellent progress in gaining recognition for RSEs. In the coming year, we want to continue this work, and attract more people to the community so that we have the weight of numbers to change how academia deals with its software developers.

Register now!

There are only 80 places available at the AGM and 60 at the hackday. If you want to attend, please register now.

The AGM and Hackday will take place at Ortus, which is based at King’s College London on 15 and 16 September 2014. More details are available on the registration page.

You can elect to attend either the AGM, the hackday or both events!

Agenda

15 September 2014 - AGM

  • 10.00-10.10: Welcome - Simon Hettrick
  • 10.10-10.40: Introduction to the RSE campaign - James Hetherington
  • 10.40-11.10: Keynote: Maudsley Digital - Kumar Jacob
  • 11.10-12.00:…
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The Research Software Engineers community was founded to support the people who develop software used in research. If you want be a part of the community, come to our AGM and hackday which takes place on 15-16 September at King’s College London. It’s a free event thanks to our sponsor Maudsley Digital.

Back in March 2012, we began raising awareness of the research community’s reliance on RSEs. In the last last year, we have made excellent progress in gaining recognition for RSEs. In the coming year, we want to continue this work, and attract more people to the community so that we have the weight of numbers to change how academia deals with its software developers.

Register now!

There are only 80 places available at the AGM and 60 at the hackday. If you want to attend, please register now.

The AGM and Hackday will take place at Ortus, which is based at King’s College London on 15 and 16 September 2014. More details are available on the registration page.

You can elect to attend either the AGM, the hackday or both events!

Agenda

15 September 2014 - AGM

  • 10.00-10.10: Welcome - Simon Hettrick
  • 10.10-10.40: Introduction to the RSE campaign - James Hetherington
  • 10.40-11.10: Keynote: Maudsley Digital - Kumar Jacob…
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By Derek Groen, Fellow and Research Assistant, Centre for Computational Science, University College London

This September I will host the first Paper Hackathon event in Flore, Northamptonshire, with help from Joanna Lewis and support from both the Software Sustainability Institute and 2020 Science.

To my knowledge, this is the first time anyone has organised a Paper Hackathon, although amusingly there has been a Hackathon focused on the IPhone Papers app. With that in mind, let me share how I thought of this, and why I think it is a good idea.

The idea

2013 was quite an eventful year for me. I became a Fellow of the Software Sustainability Institute, but I also became an Associate Fellow of the 2020 Science project. As such, I familiarised myself with two groups and their differing backgrounds, but with an unexpectedly good match in terms of aims and objectives.

Now I'm sure you're familiar with the Institute, so let me briefly explain what 2020 Science is about. As an EPSRC funded cohort project for early career researchers in computational science and natural science, it seeks to establish multi-disciplinary scientific collaborations. These collaborations are sometimes small, with two or three Fellows working on a specific topic in natural sciences, and other times quite large, with a whole group of Fellows working on a paper (see for example our…

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The winner of the Collaborations Workshop 2014 Hackaton was: Open Source health check! The runner up was GitHub Views and third Hacker of Slacker came as 3rd. Congratulations!

The complete list of Hackday projects (in the order of registration):

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