Surveys

Last year, the Software Sustainability Institute conducted a survey of Research Software Engineers (RSEs) to learn more about them and their work conditions. The RSE community has grown from a concept born at an Institute event to an international phenomenon. It's important to learn more about this community so that our campaigning, and that of our international partners, continues to help RSEs gain the recognition they deserve for their huge contribution to research.

By Olivier Philippe, Policy Researcher.

Vitae has been involved in the career and professional development of researchers for many years, gaining reputation as experts in this field. Vitae is currently exploring the feasibility of providing professional recognition for researcher development professionals including associate trainers and other university staff/professionals who have a role in developing researchers.

Regular Institute collaborator Dr. Jeffrey Carver of the University of Alabama is conducting a couple of studies relating to the way that people develop research software. These will help provide the community with a better understanding of how different practices, including code review and software metrics are being used in the development of research software.

If you'd like to provide input into these studies, please participate in the following web surveys (each of which will take approximately 15 minutes to complete): 

As part of our on-going effort to collect information about RSEs in different countries, the SSI and de-RSE have created a specific version of the UK RSE survey for Germany (more information can be found here). 

This is a story about reproducibility. It’s about the first study I conducted at the Institute, the difficulties I’ve faced in reproducing analysis that was originally conducted in Excel, and it’s testament to the power of a tweet that’s haunted me for three years.

You are invited to participate in a survey on software licensing designed to investigate how well software developers understand common open-source software licences. Prof. Gail Murphy and graduate student Daniel Almeida are looking for software developers that have built, or are currently building on, open-source software in their projects - and we are particularly interested in hearing from people building open-source software for research.

By Simon Hettrick, Deputy Director.

No one knows how much software is used in research. Look around any lab and you’ll see software – both standard and bespoke – being used by all disciplines and seniorities of researchers. Software is clearly fundamental to research, but we can’t prove this without evidence. And this lack of evidence is the reason why we ran a survey of researchers at 15 Russell Group universities to find out about their software use and background.

Headline figures 92% of academics use research software 69% say that their research would not be practical…
No one knows how much software is used in research. Look around any lab and you’ll see software – both standard and bespoke – being used by all disciplines and seniorities of researchers. Software is clearly fundamental to research, but we can’t prove this without evidence. And this lack of evidence is the reason why we ran a survey of researchers at 15 Russell Group universities to find out about their software use and background.

To secure funding for the next generation of computational research provision, EPSRC is assembling evidence to present a persuasive case for continued support. This will include capital and associated resource funding to provide the tools that the computational research community will need to carry out world leading research.

A key component of this process is to develop a science case across EPSRC’s remit which:

demonstrates current focus of computational research highlights successes identifies the future cutting edge science questions that will be a focus for the…
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