RSE Conference 2017Following the success of the First Conference of Research Software Engineers, the Second Conference will be held at the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester on the 7th-8th September 2017. We are expecting a lively, international mix of over 200 attendees and are now announcing the opening of the calls for talks, posters, workshops and tutorials.

RSE17 is not a standard academic conference! It’s a community conference: get involved and help us build the RSE Community.

The deadline is Friday 28th April, with an early deadline of Friday April 7th for those who want to apply for £250 travel bursaries.

For more information, please visit the RSE website.

Registration for the conference will open on May 31st. If you want to be notified, please sign up for notifications using this form

Most of us recognise that diverse teams are good for productivity and output. But do you know how to improve diversity and build a more inclusive environment? Have you ever heard of unconscious bias, stereotype threat or imposter syndrome? Do you ever feel like you aren’t good enough to be in the community or feel like a ‘fraud’? This WHPC event will discuss the real effects of these three topics on the workplace, providing the audience with an introduction to each theme, how they may affect you and how they impact employers, employees, advisors, managers or your peers.

This event will take place on Wednesday 5th April 10am-3pm (Coffee & Registration from 9.30am) and will encourage audience participation with the use of audience focused discussions based on case studies. This session aims generate lively discussion, generate new and novel approaches to solving some of the challenges we face and we encourage the audience to discuss challenges they have faced both as hirers/managers and as women working with HPC across all research disciplines.

The session welcomes participation from everyone that is interested in discussing improving diversity in the HPC community across all discipline.

This event is organised by Women in HPC as part of the ARCHER Outreach project.

Registration is free at EventbritePlaces are limited, so register early to avoid disappointment.

Focus groups: Alongside this event we will be running 1 hour focus groups that…

Continue Reading

Research Software Engineers, BBSRCBy Mike Croucher, Research Software Engineer at University of Sheffield and Software Sustainability Institute Fellow

Reposted with the author's permission. This article was originally published in Walking Randomly

The job title ‘Research Software Engineer’ (RSE) wasn’t really a thing until 2012 when the term was invented in a Software Sustainability Institute collaborations workshop. Of course, there were lots of people doing Research Software Engineering before then but we had around 200 different job titles, varying degrees of support and career options tended to look pretty bleak.  A lot has happened since then including the 2016 EPSRC RSE Fellowsthe first international RSE conference and a host of University-RSE groups popping up all over the country.

In my talk, Is your Research Software Correct?, I tell the audience ‘If you need help, refer to your local RSE team. All good Universities have a central RSE team and if yours does not…..I refer you back to the word ‘good'' It always…

Continue Reading

ICT research EPSRC surveyThe Employment Research Institute at Edinburgh Napier University has been commissioned by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) to carry out a survey of staff and research postgraduates working or studying –presently or formerly–in disciplines that fall under EPSRC’s Information and Communications Technologies portfolio. 

Why do many women not continue a career in Computing/ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) research? What are the barriers faced by some minority groups, such as black and ethnic minorities, in pursuing a Computing/ICT research career? These are some of the questions included in this survey. EPSRC is investigating what the barriers are, how they manifest themselves and what can be done to support underrepresented groups in ICT. This starts with an an inclusive online survey across the whole ICT research community.

Take the survey before 28th February. 

 

 

Founders of the de-RSE chapter
Founders of the de-RSE chapter

By Martin Hammitzsch, GFZ Potsdam, Stephan Janosch, MPI CBG & Frank Loeffler, Louisiana State University

The days following the first conference of Research Software Engineers (RSEs) saw the launch of a German RSE chapter de-RSE. It was formed by RSEs working inside and outside Germany, and it will further the shared objectives of RSEs and become the collective mouthpiece for RSEs within the German science.

All of the authors were exposed to the day-to-day problems caused by using software in science, and this meant that many of us were following the Software Sustainability Institute, and a few other activities around the globe. The lucky ones among us were even able to participate in events over the last few years to see how to improve our situation. Over the last few years a critical mass of motivated Research Software Engineers (RSEs) formed at various locations across Europe, North America and a few other countries. Then in September 2016, the world's first conference for RSEs took place in Manchester. It was the right time for this event. Bringing together RSEs lead to discussions about how to transfer the UKRSE spirit to other countries. How could other national science systems benefit from the professionalisation of software engineering in sciences? How can the people behind research software receive the the acknowledgement and resources they deserve?

Continue Reading

ResearchFishBy Simon Hettrick, Deputy Director.

Researchfish® allows researchers to record the impact of their research outside of the standard metric of how many papers I have written. These outcomes, as they are called, cover publications, but also collaborations, events, awards and other metrics including - and of most interest to me - software.

Researchfish® was established with the support of MRC and initially focused on collecting outcomes from medical research. It has since been adopted by a broad range of funders, including the UK’s seven Research Councils. I recently had an interesting talk with the EPSRC’s Louise Tillman about what these outcomes might say about research software in the UK and, thanks to her, a week later I found myself in possession of a spreadsheet containing the research outcomes related to software for EPSRC researchers.

Just having the outcomes is pretty exciting, but to make things more interesting, I decided that I would write the analysis code myself. I’m not a software developer, but it’s getting progressively more difficult to stay that way when I spend my life surrounded by Research Software Engineers. Hence this post not only reports an investigation into Researchfish…

Continue Reading

As part of the ongoing public consultation on the midterm evaluation of Horizon 2020, the Free Software Foundation Europe published and submitted to the European Commission its Position paper for the endorsement of Free Software and Open Standards in Horizon 2020, the biggest EU Research and Innovation programme.

Because software is a vital part of today's scientific research, the FSFE believes that Open Access policies promoted in the framework of Horizon 2020 should also explicitly cover the publication of software under Free Software licences. This way, the EU will truly support Open Science.

If you would like to contribute your views, please read more about how to participate in the public consultation and how to share the FSFE's position paper, here: https://wiki.fsfe.org/Activities/OpenScience_InterimEvaluation_Horizon2020

The consultation, run by the European Commission is open for everyone until 15th January 2017.

Photo of inflatable Santa by Bart FieldsEveryone at the Software Sustainability Institute would like to wish our friends and colleagues all the best for the holiday season.

After a busy year, including the first Conference of Research Software Engineers, the announcement of a wonderful new set of Fellows, and even more eventsSoftware and Data Carpentry workshops, and Open Call projects, we need a little break to get ready for everything we've planned in 2017. So please excuse us while we switch off our email from the 23rd December to the 2nd January, and enjoy the festive season (responsibly)!

RSE conferenceBy Catherine Jones, Diversity Chair.

Why did the RSE Conference have a diversity chair? What was the impact? What can we do better next time? These are the three questions I hope this blog will answer.

Different backgrounds and experiences enhance a team and help to avoid group think. Diversity has many different aspects, but the main two that the RSE conference focussed on were gender and ethnicity. It was an aspiration that the conference organisers, speakers and attendees reflected the makeup of the RSE community. Having someone responsible for diversity ensured that it was consciously considered during planning. As part of this commitment to diversity, the RSE Conference had a diversity statement  and code of conduct.

Who organised it?

What was the makeup of the committee? This was remarkedly gender balanced for the domain, the chart belows shows the gender split. Sadly it wasn’t very ethnically diverse.

Gender on committee

Who contributed?

Of the registered attendees 72% were male, 16% were female and 12% preferred not to say or didn’t answer. So that for those who identified their gender 18% were female. Looking at ethnicity: 76%…

Continue Reading

Participants of #hgfos16By Stephan Janosch, Research Software Engineer at Max-Planck-Institute for Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden

RSEs in Germany

A handful of people from Germany attended the first Research Software Engineers conference #RSE16. However, few as they may have been, they made a plan: to transfer the community spirit among research software engineers from the UK  back to Germany. After some discussion, we decided  to register the domain http://www.de-RSE.org and set up a website and a mailing list.

Once the mailing list was online, a big surprise was posted within a few days: a free open science workshop for 70 people on scientific software would take place on November 2016 in Germany. Now, that would be the perfect chance to kick start a German RSE community, wouldn’t it?

Workshop—“Access to and reuse of scientific software”

November was upon us faster than expected, and so was the 1.5-day workshop (hashtag: #hgfos16) about accessibility and reuse of scientific software, organised by the Helmholtz Open Science office. An audience of 77 people, as diverse as that at #RSE16, listened to three…

Continue Reading