RSE community

Registration for RSE 2018 in Birmingham in September is now open  

The last two conferences sold out, so the organising committee added 50% more tickets this year. However, tickets go fast, so please sign up early. 

The programme of talks, workshops and keynotes have been planned around the following themes:

* Good practice for software development

* Researcher-developer partnerships

* Community and careers

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7838388322_8883573e4e_z.jpgBy Martin Callaghan, University of Leeds, Daniel S. Katz, University of Illinois, Alexander Struck, Cluster of Excellence Image Knowledge Gestaltung, HU-Berlin, and Matt Williams, University of Bristol, 

This post is part of the Collaborations Workshops 2018 speed blogging series.

This blog post is the result of a discussion group during the Collaborations Workshop 2018 organised by the Software Sustainability Institute. We talked about some national and institutional efforts being made to establish RSE groups and positions and are writing this blog to share our thoughts. The most successful of these RSE efforts have come from within UK universities. We believe sharing strategies and case studies on how to implement pilots should help grassroots movements and support…

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Following the success of the Second Conference of Research Software Engineers, the RSE conference 2018 will take place at the Bramall Building at the University of Birmingham, on 3rd-4th September 2018. RSE18 is the perfect opportunity to promote your products and services to research software engineering leaders and decision makers (present and future) at the only conference purpose built for RSEs.

The organising committee welcome submissions for workshops and talks for the RSE18 conference. The aim is to reflect the diverse community of research software engineers by seeking input from a variety of domains, geographic locations, gender, ethnicities and experience.

The conference themes for RSE18 are:

  • Good practice for software development

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The Software Sustainability Institute is organising the “Workshop: Impact of international collaborations in research software”, taking place on Tuesday 24th April 2018, at the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester.

We welcome submissions of posters from researchers based in the UK that demonstrate the impact of computational research / research enabled by software. We’re particularly looking for examples of how collaboration has benefited your work and will give priority to EPSRC researchers, though all research domain areas will be considered. The best examples will also be offered a short presentation slot (5-10 minutes) at the event.

Submissions (of no more than one A4 page) should include a short description of your research and the software used, an example of the impact it has had, and the role that collaboration has played in your work.

Please submit your proposal via this form by 26th March 2018.

Register for the event at http://bit.ly/rseimpact

Further information

Earlier this year, EPSRC awarded the Software Sustainability Institute and EPCC money to fund UK-US RSE collaboration and to run a “Best Use of Archer competition”. As part of the planned activity funded by this grant, this event will showcase the impact of the awards and provide a space to discuss opportunities to build on international collaboration.…

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4982558043_06968b80f1_z.jpgBy Olivier Philippe, Policy Researcher.

DOI

Last year, the Software Sustainability Institute conducted a survey of Research Software Engineers (RSEs) to learn more about them and their work conditions. The RSE community has grown from a concept born at an Institute event to an international phenomenon. It's important to learn more about this community so that our campaigning, and that of our international partners, continues to help RSEs gain the recognition they deserve for their huge contribution to research.

We began surveying RSEs in 2016, in 2017 we also surveyed Canadian RSEs and last year we added four further countries. Our thanks to our partners: Scott Henwood (Canada), Stephan Janosch and Martin Hammitzsch (Germany), Ben van Werkhoven and Tom Bakker (Netherlands), Anelda van der Walt (South Africa) and Daniel S. Katz and Sandra Gesing (USA).

Visit our RSE survey page for an overview of the results and access to the data and analysis.

1_LmBD9OaRAJPnBYBoZwyZMw.jpgBy the Netherlands eScience Center

This post was originally published at the NL eScience centre blog.

Research software has become an indispensable instrument for virtually every academic researcher. A case in point: survey data from the UK revealed that 92% of academics use research software, 69% say that their research would not be practical without it and 56% develop their own software. Creating, storing and analyzing data is crucial in researchers’ daily work and enables them to address increasingly challenging research questions.

This rapid digitization of research has strongly increased the number of people writing and contributing to research software. This is part of a more general trend, where positions like data stewardsinformation managers, research data officer, research supporter and other non-traditional research positions are becoming increasingly recognized as intrinsic positions in the academic research ecosystem. To increase the impact, recognition and visibility of research software in academia, we (ePlan and the Netherlands eScience Center) have taken the initiative to start and…

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By Simon Hettrick 

Next week, we will be hearing from the successful applicants to last year’s RSE Fellowship, funded by the EPSRC. The Fellows are exceptional individuals in the software field who demonstrate leadership and have combined expertise in programming and a solid knowledge of the research environment.

We’ll first hear from Jeremy Cohen who believes that “research software ought to be easier to use” and will describe his plans to help build communities of RSEs. We’ll hear why Phil Hasnip believes that most physics problems end up being materials problems. Joanna Leng will describe her desire to bring research computing techniques into the imaging community. Finally, we’ll hear from Leila Mureşan who will focus on the field of microscopy imaging.

The EPSRC has recognised the importance of investing in software development and the development of skills and career development for those engaged in software engineering. It is these aspects that this RSE Fellowship addresses. The Software Sustainability Institute and the RSE community campaigned for the development of this Fellowship so, and we are very happy to welcome the new RSE Fellows!

We would like to invite everyone working on research software in the Netherlands to complete the RSE survey and spread the word.

The Netherlands Research Software Engineer community (NL-RSE) was started to gain insight into the various communities of RSEs in the Netherlands and increase the interaction between them. The RSE surveys in the UK in 2016 and 2017 [1, 2] have allowed to gain valuable insights and spread the word about the RSE movement. That is why the Netherlands eScience CenterePLAN (Platform of eScience/Data Research Centres in the Netherlands), NL-RSE, and the UK RSE Association are organising this survey for 2017 in the Netherlands.

The study is conducted by the University of Southampton on behalf of the Software Sustainability Institute and complies with University of Southampton ethics guidelines (reference no.: ERGO/FPSE/30610). The investigators are Simon Hettrick and Olivier Philippe. Contacts in the Netherlands are Ben van Werkhoven and Tom Bakker from the Netherlands eScience Center.

[1]: See RSE State of the Nation Report 2017, page 21.

[2]: See UK-…

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The Software Sustainability Institute and zaf-RSE invite anyone coding in and for academia in South Africa to complete this survey on research software. 

As of now there is not much knowledge about the community of those in research and science who develop software. This survey aims to gain valuable insights into this community in order to support research funders and other institutions to develop strategies and funding programs as well as policies.

Last and this years’ UK surveys [1, 2] allowed to gain valuable insights. We would like to build on the momentum gained in the UK RSE community and help to create a voice for the South African RSE community. Similar surveys will be conducted in Canada, Australia, Norway, the Netherlands, the USA and again in the UK. For reasons of comparability, this survey was closely coordinated with the others. We thank Prof Ilani Loubser from the North-West University's Space Physics programme for working with the NWU eResearch Initiative to provide South African context to the survey.

This survey gives South African researchers and scientist the opportunity to make their point of view and experiences be heard, and thus be part of the development of this community. It would be also very helpful if you could spread the word to others who develop software in the South African research landscape, or anyone who employs software experts in the South African academic landscape.

There are ca. 65 questions in this survey. It takes about 10 - 15 minutes to complete. Please note that this research is not compulsory and even if you decide to participate you can withdraw at any…

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As part of our on-going effort to collect information about RSEs in different countries, the SSI and de-RSE have created a specific version of the UK RSE survey for Germany (more information can be found here). 

Participants are needed for this survey on research software and people writing scientific software for Germany. If you are coding in and for academia in Germany then complete the survey and help us spread the word. You can also access a german version of the survey.

As of now there is not much knowledge about the community of those in research and science who develop software. This survey aims to gain valuable insights into this community in order to support research funders and other institutions to develop strategies and funding programs as well as policies.

Last and this years’ UK surveys [1, 2] allowed to gain valuable insights. To continue our success with this campaign, we need to track how the community evolves at other places. Simultaneously, similar surveys will be conducted in Canada, Australia, Norway, the Netherlands, the USA and South Africa. For reasons of comparability, this survey was closely coordinated with the others.

This survey gives German researchers and scientists the opportunity for their point of view and experiences to be heard and thus be part of the development of this community. It would be also very helpful if you could spread the word to others who develop…

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