Software sustainability

By Software Sustainability Institute Fellow Leandro Liborio
BioExcel’s webinar series will continue on 21 November with a presentation by Steve Crouch.
By Neil Chue Hong, founding Director and Principal Investigator of the Software Sustainability Institute Why do open source research software projects appear to have a low rate of success? Is it because we lack appropriate models for sustaining research software development or is it because the community isn’t seeing the results?
By Mario Antonioletti, Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre and The Software Sustainability Institute. In this second post, we argue that in order to have a sustainable future you must not only employ good software techniques but also ensure that you create a future workforce that can develop and/or want to use your software.
By Mario Antonioletti, Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre and The Software Sustainability Institute. Producing sustainable software is not just about employing good practice – e.g. using a revision control system, documentation, testing, etc. – but also about ensuring that, for a long term future, we can generate motivated, well-trained developers that will continue to contribute to and develop your software, as well as creating a potential set of savvy end users that will  want to use it.
By Anne Wärme Lykke, Communications Officer at DTU Biosustain This post was originally published at the DTU Biosustain website. Software is like a puppy – it needs attendance, maintenance and care, or it dies. This and many other points were on the agenda at a 2-day workshop called “Software in the life sciences: development, usability, sustainability”.
By Patrick J.C. Aerts and Shoaib Sufi. The Workshop on Sustainable Software Sustainability 2019 (WOSSS19) will take place from the 24th to the 26th April 2019 in The Hague, Netherlands. WOSSS19 is a follow-up workshop from WOSSS17 and will focus on all aspects around keeping software running: from how to revive important legacy to preventing new legacy issues through education and guidelines.
By Andrew Edmondson​​​​​​​, Mike Zentner, and Cristian A. Marocico. We’re writing this blog from the perspective of people who are responsible for helping researchers in our institutions develop their own software for their own research purposes. We want to help our communities to make the right decisions about the sustainability of their software – and therefore about their time and money.

By Matthew Upson, Data Scientist at Juro.

Are you working on a research software project, and would like to develop and scale your work? Would you like to create a business plan, understand cybersecurity, and learn about alternative funding models?

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