News

The National Archives are looking for a Head of Digital and Technology Research position in Richmond, Surrey.

The National Archives has set itself the ambition of becoming a digital archive by instinct and design. The digital strategy takes this forward through the notion of a disruptive archive which positively reimagines established archival practice, and develops new ways of solving core digital challenges. In relation to digital preservation of the public record, our challenges are not only about capturing and storing complex data, digital objects and systems, but also about making these accessible and exploitable.

Full details at Head of Digital and Technology Research job advert.

Are you passionate about data sharing and moving research forward? DataCite are looking for an application developer to join their team. The ideal candidate has experience writing open source software and a basic understanding of scholarly communication infrastructure.

DataCite is based in Hannover, Germany, but the position is suited for remote work from other places in Germany or other countries in Europe. Travel to meet with DataCite members and other partners is expected. The position includes work for projects funded by the European Commission and other funders.

For more information, please see the vacancy details.

RCUK are conducting a survey to understand the skills and training needs of researchers using UK computational research resources, including traditional HPC for simulations and modelling to high throughput and data-intensive science applications. If your work is supported by a non-desktop system then this survey applies to you!

The data will be used to understand the range of skills across the UK HPC community, and the training needed to fill those skills gaps. The survey will take no more than 10 minutes to complete and closes on 1st September 2017.

Take the survey.

The Department of Parasitology is seeking a Software Engineer to investigate the impact of drug and insecticide resistance on Malaria Control and elimination programmes using the Open Malaria simulation package. As considerable resources are being invested in this direction, optimal use of these resources can be guided by appropriate computer simulations. We use modern computational power to simulate the entire process of malaria transmission and its impact on human health, burden on local health services, and cost-effectiveness of proposed control interventions using the OpenMalaria simulation platform developed over the last 12 years at the Swiss Tropical and Public Institute in Basel. The Research Software Engineer will be running the Openmalaria simulations and collating the output data in meaningful formats. These data will form part of reports and publications and hence, it is important that the simulation output data are well documented. The jobholder will also update the code as and when new factors are identified during the research. The role entails providing support for other simulation runs in collaboration with our colleagues at Swiss TPH which may require periodic, short visits to Basle  (<1 week duration).

The Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) is an internationally recognised centre of excellence for research in tropical diseases.  Through the creation of effective links with governments, organisations and institutions and by responding to the health needs of communities, LSTM aims to promote improved health, particularly for people of the less developed/resource poorest countries in the tropics and sub-tropics.

To be successful in this role, it is…

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The Research Software Group and the Software Sustainability have organised a Data Carpentry workshop, which will take place on 1st & 2nd August 2017 at the University of Southampton.

The course will cover data organisation in spreadsheets and OpenRefine, SQL for data management, and an introduction to R for data analysis. By the end of the workshop, learners will be able to more effectively analyse and manage their data to aid reproducibilty and  to increase their chances of furthering their research.

For further information and registration, please visit the event page.

Data Carpentry is an international movement to teach researchers better software skills. For more information about Data Carpentry, visit their website.

We are pleased to announce the first two awardees from the EPSRC USA-UK Research Software Engineer Travel fund. This funding aims to encourage greater collaboration between the UK and USA-based Research Software Engineer communities to help with: investigating emerging hardware and the impact on software; building collaboration around a particular science area; developing common community codes; and building links between computational / computer science and mathematics. The deadline for the next round of the fund is 1st August.

Awardees

Dr Chris Richardson, EPSRC Research Software Engineering Fellow at the University of Cambridge BP Institute and core developer of the FEnICS software environment for finite element analysis, has been awarded money to enable the visit to the UK of Greg von Winckel, the developer of the ROL optimisation library based at Sandia National Labs. Greg will give seminars in Oxford and Cambridge to share knowledge of the current capabilities of the underlying ROL library and work with Chris and his team on code sprints to develop PyROL, a Python interface to ROL that will enable integration with FEnICS and other codes.

Dr Martin Turner, currently Relationship Manager in the University of Manchester, has had related overlapping secondments being Visualisation Director for the Harwell Imaging Partnership (HIP) at STFC/RAL and Visualisation Group Leader within the Scientific Computing Division in STFC/DL, has been awarded money to support the visit of Marcus D. Hanwell, Technical Leader at Kitware, and lead for the…

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Women in HPC will once again attend the Supercomputing conference to discuss diversity and inclusivity topics. Activities will bring together women from across the international HPC community, provide opportunities to network, showcase the work of inspiring women, and discuss how we can all work towards improving the under-representation of women in supercomputing.

The 7th International Women in High Performance Computing (WHPC) workshop at SC17 in Denver brings  together the HPC community to discuss the growing importance of increasing diversity in the workplace. This workshop will recognise and discuss the challenges of improving the proportion of women in the HPC community, and is relevant for employers and employees throughout the supercomputing workforce who are interested in addressing diversity. 

Sessions include:

- Improving Diversity in the Workplace: What methods have been put in place and tested to improve workplace diversity and inclusion?

- Career Development and Mentoring: Skills to thrive; sharing your experiences and advice on how to succeed in the workplace.

- Virtual Poster Showcase: Highlighting work from women across industry and academia. 

Call for posters: Now Open!

Deadline for submissions: August 13th 2017 AOE

As part of the workshop, Women in HPC invite submissions from women in industry and academia to present their work as a virtual poster. This will promote the engagement of women in HPC research and applications, provide opportunities for peer to peer networking, and the opportunity to interact with female role models and employers. Submissions are invited on all topics relating to HPC from…

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The Software Sustainability Institute is organising Carpentry Instructor Training workshop at the University of Manchester from 4th to 5th September 2017, just before WSSSPE5.1 and RSE 2017—making it a nice week in Manchester.

The Instructor Training is an intensive two-day workshop for trainers who wish to become Software Carpentry and Data Carpentry instructors. It is strongly recommended that attendees have some previous exposure to Data and/or Software Carpentry workshops, either as students, helpers, observers or co-instructors.

The event is sold out at the moment, but you can still join the waiting list.

 

The UK Open Research Data Task Force has just released a report looking at the Research Data Infrastructure Landscape in the UK and beyond. The report provides a thorough overview of the infrastructure that supports open research data in the UK and abroad.

It details the policies that have been implemented by research funders and universities themselves; the technological platforms and tools developed at local, national and international levels; and the cultural challenges that are still present across different disciplinary research groups. The report has been reviewed and discussed by members of the Open Research Data Taskforce who represent HEFCE, RCUK, Wellcome Trust, UUK, Jisc, BEIS, academics from a number of disciplines and champions of open research data, including Software Sustainability Institute Co-Investigator, Professor David De Roure.

The report highlights a number of issues covering technical, cultural and behavioural, and operational and policy concerns. With respect to software, the report notes that:

"Few data policies make more than passing reference to software and code, though they can constitute a significant barrier to data sharing and open data. For they are integral to the generation of research data; and access to them is essential if users are to be able to re-use data effectively or validate research findings. There is potential to use software management plans to encourage researchers to consider how the code they develop is organised and published, improving its reuse and the…

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Steve Harris' article "Data Science for Docs" was recently published as the guest editorial in Bulletin, July 2017, the magazine for members of the National College of Anaesthetics, which reaches every anaesthetist in the UK (largest hospital speciality). 

You can find the article on pages 12 and 13 of Bulletin, Issue 104.