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Understanding how to choose a piece of software is difficult. What code should I bet my research on? Will the project producing the software grow or shrink? Is the code base stable or changing? Does the project depend on one organisation or many? Is the community healthy or hopelessly ill?

At the Software Sustainability Institute, we want to ensure that research software is sustainable. One of the ways we can do this is by measuring the general health of the community around the software and developing methodologies and tools for analysing modern software development. With this in place, we can improve the health of projects and make it easier to answer the questions above.

We are therefore delighted that the Software Sustainability Institute is a founding partner in the Community Health Analytics Open Source Software project (CHAOSS). CHAOSS is a new Linux Foundation project focused on creating the analytics and metrics to help define community health that was officially launched this week.

The aims of the project are to:

  • Establish standard implementation-agnostic metrics for measuring software community activity, contributions, and health, which are objective and repeatable.
  • Produce integrated open source software for analyzing software community development.

Other members contributing to the project include Bitergia, Eclipse Foundation, Jono Bacon Consulting, Laval University (Canada),…

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Today, we’ll be hosting a Launch Webinar online where Raniere Silva, our Community Officer, will talk about the Programme, and Nikoleta Glynatsi, Gary Leeming, David Perez-Suarez, Iza A. Romanowska and Melody Sandells will share their experiences as Institute Fellows. This will be a great opportunity to ask questions or get further information.

The webinar will start at 2.00pm BST and to take part you just need to connect to our YouTube event.

The Institute's Fellowship programme funds researchers in exchange for their expertise and advice.

The main goals of the Programme are gathering intelligence about research and software from all disciplines, encouraging Fellows to develop their interests in the area of software sustainability (especially in their areas of research) and aid them as ambassadors of good software practice in their domains. 

For further information, please visit the Fellowship Programme page and the FAQ, which include details about eligibility.

Applications for the Software Sustainability Institute Fellowship Programme 2018 are now open.

The main goals of the Programme are gathering intelligence about research and software from all disciplines, encouraging Fellows to develop their interests in the area of software sustainability (especially in their areas of work) and aiding the Fellows as ambassadors of good software practice in their domains. The programme also supports capacity building and policy development initiatives.

For further information, please visit the Fellowship Programme page and the FAQ, which include details about eligibility.

On 15th September, we will host a webinar where you will be able to find out more about the programme, the application process, existing Fellows experiences and have your questions answered. The webinar will run from from 2.00pm to 3.30pm BST. If you are interested in participate in the webinar please register your interest.

Applications for the Software Sustainability Institute Fellowship Programme 2018 will open this Friday 25th August.

The main goals of the Programme are gathering intelligence about research and software from all disciplines, encouraging Fellows to develop their interests in the area of software sustainability (especially in their areas of research) and aiding the Fellows as ambassadors of good software practice in their domains. The programme also supports capacity building, including Software Carpentry, Data Carpentry and Library Carpentry training workshops and policy development initiatives.

Fellows come from a variety of career stages. They have passion for their area, ability to communicate ideas effectively, and a real interest in the role of software in research. The fellowship gives our fellows the opportunity to talk about software in their research domain to a wider audience, network with others who share a passion for software in research, and learn key skills that benefit them and their collaborators.​

Further information is available at the Fellowship Programme page and applications will open on Friday 25th August, 10:00. Register your interest here to be notify when the applications are open.

We are pleased to announce the next awardees from the EPSRC USA-UK Research Software Engineer Travel fund. This funding aims to encourage greater collaboration between the UK and USA-based Research Software Engineer communities to help with: investigating emerging hardware and the impact on software; building collaboration around a particular science area; developing common community codes; and building links between computational / computer science and mathematics. The deadline for the next round of the fund is 1st September.

Awardees

A consortium led by Dr James Hetherington, Head of the Research Software Development Group at UCL and Head of Research Engineering at the Alan Turing Institute, comprising the five Alan Turing Institute partners (UCL, University of Cambridge, University of Edinburgh, University of Oxford, and University of Warwick) has been awarded money to help establish an ongoing exchange program with the three US Moore-Sloan Data Science Environments at University of California Berkeley, New York University and the University of Washington. The funding will help to bring across leading data scientists / RSEs including Dr Ariel Rokem, Dr Claudio Silva, Dr Jacob VanderPlas, and Dr Stéfan van der Walt, for an un-conference event hosted at the ATI to identify collaborations and visits to partner sites.

Dr David Henty, group manager at EPCC at the University of Edinburgh, has been awarded money to support the visit of Dr Elsa…

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The National Archives are looking for a Head of Digital and Technology Research position in Richmond, Surrey.

The National Archives has set itself the ambition of becoming a digital archive by instinct and design. The digital strategy takes this forward through the notion of a disruptive archive which positively reimagines established archival practice, and develops new ways of solving core digital challenges. In relation to digital preservation of the public record, our challenges are not only about capturing and storing complex data, digital objects and systems, but also about making these accessible and exploitable.

Full details at Head of Digital and Technology Research job advert.

Are you passionate about data sharing and moving research forward? DataCite are looking for an application developer to join their team. The ideal candidate has experience writing open source software and a basic understanding of scholarly communication infrastructure.

DataCite is based in Hannover, Germany, but the position is suited for remote work from other places in Germany or other countries in Europe. Travel to meet with DataCite members and other partners is expected. The position includes work for projects funded by the European Commission and other funders.

For more information, please see the vacancy details.

RCUK are conducting a survey to understand the skills and training needs of researchers using UK computational research resources, including traditional HPC for simulations and modelling to high throughput and data-intensive science applications. If your work is supported by a non-desktop system then this survey applies to you!

The data will be used to understand the range of skills across the UK HPC community, and the training needed to fill those skills gaps. The survey will take no more than 10 minutes to complete and closes on 1st September 2017.

Take the survey.

The Department of Parasitology is seeking a Software Engineer to investigate the impact of drug and insecticide resistance on Malaria Control and elimination programmes using the Open Malaria simulation package. As considerable resources are being invested in this direction, optimal use of these resources can be guided by appropriate computer simulations. We use modern computational power to simulate the entire process of malaria transmission and its impact on human health, burden on local health services, and cost-effectiveness of proposed control interventions using the OpenMalaria simulation platform developed over the last 12 years at the Swiss Tropical and Public Institute in Basel. The Research Software Engineer will be running the Openmalaria simulations and collating the output data in meaningful formats. These data will form part of reports and publications and hence, it is important that the simulation output data are well documented. The jobholder will also update the code as and when new factors are identified during the research. The role entails providing support for other simulation runs in collaboration with our colleagues at Swiss TPH which may require periodic, short visits to Basle  (<1 week duration).

The Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) is an internationally recognised centre of excellence for research in tropical diseases.  Through the creation of effective links with governments, organisations and institutions and by responding to the health needs of communities, LSTM aims to promote improved health, particularly for people of the less developed/resource poorest countries in the tropics and sub-tropics.

To be successful in this role, it is…

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The Research Software Group and the Software Sustainability have organised a Data Carpentry workshop, which will take place on 1st & 2nd August 2017 at the University of Southampton.

The course will cover data organisation in spreadsheets and OpenRefine, SQL for data management, and an introduction to R for data analysis. By the end of the workshop, learners will be able to more effectively analyse and manage their data to aid reproducibilty and  to increase their chances of furthering their research.

For further information and registration, please visit the event page.

Data Carpentry is an international movement to teach researchers better software skills. For more information about Data Carpentry, visit their website.