Data Carpentry

CDT mapThe Software Sustainability Institute has gathered information on the Centres for Doctoral Training (CDTs) in a map, as some of them may require training in basic software development skills to help scientists improve or speed up their research, ensure that their results are more reliable and verifiable, encourage sharing code and collaboration with others and aid reproducibility overall. As the Institute already has multi-year training agreements with some CDTs relating to running and coordinating Software Carpentry (SWC) and Data Carpentry (DC) workshops, we were also interested to identify other centres, which may be interested in either helping with setting up regional training centres or setting up their own software training.

Centres for Doctoral Training (CDTs), also called Doctoral Training Centres (DTCs), are one of the several ways by which research councils in the UK provide support for advanced, high-level and increasingly interdisciplinary scientific training following undergraduate studies.

Go to the interactive map and find out more.

 

Species modelling run outputBy Thomas Etherington, Senior Research Leader, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and Institute Fellow.

Species distribution models are a computational technique commonly used to map the likely geographic occurrence of organisms.  For example, here at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, we use species distribution models to help conserve plants. This conservation occurs in situ by protecting areas that models show are more likely to contain plants of interest, and also conserving plants ex situ by targeting expeditions to areas more likely to have plants from which seeds can be collected for storage in Kew’s Millennium Seed Bank.

Due to their importance in conservation, species distribution models should, like any scientific computational method, be done in an open manner so that the findings can be replicated and confirmed. Unfortunately, my experience in reading and reviewing scientific papers suggests that many scientists are still using GUI software rather than using a coding approach that enables such replication. I suspect this is probably due to a lack of computational training amongst species distribution modellers, and hence this could be something I could aim to rectify this year as part of my…

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There are still some places left at the Data Carpentry for Social Scientists and Humanities workshop organised by the SSI Fellow 2016 Heather Ford at the University of Leeds on 21-22 November 2016. 

This two-day event is aimed at researchers in the social sciences, humanities and other disciplines who want to learn how to use popular tools for data cleaning, management and visualisation in a hands-on, interactive workshop. 

Instructor TrainingBy Steve Crouch, Software Sustainability Institute, with Karin Lagesen, University of Oslo, and Laurent Gatto, University of Cambridge.

Last month, we held a Software and Data Carpentry Instructor Training workshop at the University of Cambridge, sponsored by the R Consortium. The demand for Carpentry events in the UK, and trained instructors to facilitate them, has always been very high, and I found this to be a very enjoyable event to increase the instructor pool in the UK.

The main organiser of the event was Laurent Gatto, a Software Sustainability Institute Fellow who has delivered numerous Carpentry courses since becoming a certified instructor in 2014. We also had the able helping hands of Paul Judge and Gabriella Rustici from the University of Cambridge Bioinformatics Training facility, who assisted greatly with the event and helped us make great use of the sophisticated presentation systems present in the training room.

The workshop was held on 19th and 20th of September, with myself and Karin Lagesen as instructors. We were delighted with the very high level of engagement from the 25 trainees - this was very much the kind of group we hope…

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In collaboration with Software Sustainability Institute, ARCHER are running a Data Carpentry two-day workshop on November 2nd & 3rd, 2016. ARCHER, the UK's national supercomputing service, offers training in software development and high-performance computing to scientists and researchers across the UK.

Who: The course is aimed at graduate students and other researchers.

Where: James Clerk Maxwell Building, Peter Guthrie Tait Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3FD. Requirements: Participants must bring a laptop with a Mac, Linux, or Windows operating sytem (not a tablet, Chromebook, etc.) that they have administrative privileges on.

The workshop will cover Data organization in spreadsheets and OpenRefine, Introduction to R, Data analysis and visualization in R and SQL for data management. Participants should bring their laptops and plan to participate actively. By the end of the workshop learners should be able to more effectively manage and analyze data and be able to apply the tools and approaches directly to their ongoing research.

Requirements

Attendees should have a few specific software packages installed (listed below). They are also required to abide by Data Carpentry's Code of Conduct.Further information and registration

To register, please visit the ARCHER training page.

For further information and requirements, please visit the…

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Data Carpentry is programme inspired by Software Carpentry. Both programmes maintain close ties which helps to build a community of practice among the instructors and expand the base of teaching materials. Data Carpentry aims to teach the skills that will enable researchers to be more effective and productive in working with data.

As an official Data Carpentry Foundation Partner, we coordinate Software Carpentry activities in the UK by helping organise workshops for the UK research community. For more information about our collaboration with Data Carpentry or organising a Data Carpentry workshop in the UK, email us at info@software.ac.uk.

What is Data Carpentry

Data Carpentry Foundation is a sister organisation of Software Carpentry Foundation designed to teach researchers skills to retrieve, view, manipulate, analyse and store their or other people's data in an open and reproducible way.

Data Carpentry workshops have been running since 2014. As in Software Carpentry, teaching is delivered through intensive two-day workshops. Contrary to Software Carpentry, Data Carpentry designs the…

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Data Carpentry (http://datacarpentry.org) seeks to hire a full-time staff member to direct its assessment activities. This person will design, implement, monitor, analyze, and report on a comprehensive system of metrics to help the Data Carpentry project and its sibling organization, Software Carpentry (http://software-carpentry.org), evaluate the impact and effectiveness of the training they offer, to both learners and instructors.

Data Carpentry is a not-for-profit organization developing and teaching workshops on fundamental data skills needed to conduct research. Its mission is to provide researchers high-quality, domain-specific training covering the full lifecycle of data-driven research. Data Carpentry lessons are intentionally domain specific, and span the life, physical, and social sciences. Data Carpentry workshops create an environment friendly to learners who have little to no prior computational experience, and are designed to empower researchers to apply the skills learned to data driven discovery in their own research.

The Deputy Director of Assessment position is initially funded for 2 years through a grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation. The incumbent will be hired and paid as a contractor of NumFOCUS, Data Carpentry’s fiscal sponsor and grant funds administrator. Review of applications will begin May 20, 2016, and the position will remain open until filled.

For a full description, including instructions on how to apply, please see http://www.datacarpentry.org/jobs/.

By Aleksandra Pawlik, Training Leader

Last week the Institute in collaboration with the North West UniversityCape Town University and Talarify helped run the first face-to-face Software and Data Carpentry Instructor Training. 23 new instructors from South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe and Kenya attended the event. After the workshop the Institute's work was also presented at the Association of South African University Directors of Information Technology (ASAUDIT) Autumn General Institutional Meeting. 

The Instructor Training started off on Sunday, 17th April in the evening with a short ice-breaking session of lightning talks during which the participants talked about "The coolest thing about their job" for 2 minutes. The experience in chairing similar sessions during the Institute's Collaborations Workshop turned out to be invaluable!

On Monday we introduced the participants to the Mozilla Science Lab Study Groups. The goal of this session was to create foundations for collaborative, peer-to-peer environments in which researchers can share their knowledge and skills.  After lunch we moved on to the Instructor Training curriculum. All participants were very engaged during the group exercises and were eager to discuss effective approaches to teaching and the practical applications of educational psychology theories. One of the most…

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The Software Sustainability Institute will host the Data and Software Carpentry in-person Instructor Training on 4-5th May 2016 in Edinburgh. A number of attendees who have been ​on a waiting list for the training have already signed up but there are still several places left.

If you want to take part in this Instructor Training please register via Eventbrite. Once you completed the registration, please fill in a short survey form. The places for the Edinburgh workshop are limited, however please note that we recognize the high demand for Instructor Training in the UK and we are doing our best to meet that demand.

 

This Software and Data Carpentry Instructor Training workshop was the first one from a series of three workshops run in Australia and New Zealand. In both countries the growing demand for Software and Data Carpentry training meant that there was a need to grow instructor pool on the Southern Hemisphere. Aleksandra Pawlik who is one of the instructor trainers was invited to run these workshops in January 2016.

The main organiser of the Instructor Training in Brisbane was Belinda Weaver who is in charge of delivering cloud solutions and supporting research at the Queensland Cyber Infrastructure Foundation. Belinda is also one of the most experienced Australian instructors and has been collaborating with Software Carpentry for a long time.

The workshop, held on 18th and 19th January 2016, was hosted at the sunny campus of the University of Queensland. With support of a lot of sunshine and excellent coffee Aleksandra was able to overcome the jetlag and run the workshop attended by 20 participants from various Australian research organisations. Belinda put a lot of effort into composing a group of individuals with strong interest in training and with experience in Software and Data Carpentry workshops.

The participants were very keen to collaborate together during the exercises and discuss best practices for teaching. Many were able to put what…

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