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Docker Containers, Reproducible ResearchSubmit your abstract by 31st March 2017 at midnight.

Presenters are invited to submit abstracts for 15-minute talks (plus 5 minutes for questions) and lightning talks on the following subjects:

  • Examples of use—positive or otherwise and lessons learned
  • Position papers
  • Applications for Reproducible Research
  • Other use cases
  • Building other tools around container ecosystem
  • Comparing different types of containers
  • The future and challenges for adoption, or lack thereof, in specific communities

The Software Sustainability Institute’s Docker Containers for Reproducible Research Workshop (C4RR) will take place on from 27th to 28th June 2017 in Cambridge. C4RR aims to gain insight into the topics of containers technologies and how these impact and will impact on research. It is…

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The Software Sustainability Institute’s Docker Containers for Reproducible Research Workshop brings together researchers, developers and educators to explore best practices when using containers and the future of research software with containers. The Docker Containers for Reproducible Research Workshop (C4RR) will take place from 27th to 28th June 2017 at Cambridge.

We welcome abstracts for 15-minute talks (plus 5 minutes for questions) and lightning talks about containers, including but not limited to Docker and Singularity, on the following subjects:

  • Examples of use—positive or otherwise and lessons learned
  • Position papers
  • Applications for Reproducible Research
  • Other use cases
  • Building other tools around container ecosystem
  • Comparing different types of containers
  • The future and challenges for adoption, or lack thereof, in specific communities

Submit your proposal by 31st March 2017 at midnight.

Notifications will be made on 28th April 2017.

Container ship.Twitter: #C4RR

The Software Sustainability Institute’s Docker Containers for Reproducible Research Workshop brings together researchers, developers and educators to explore best practices when using containers, not only Docker, and the future of research software with containers. Docker Containers for Reproducible Research Workshop (C4RR) will take place from 27th to 28th June 2017 at Cambridge.

Call for Papers

We welcome abstracts for 15-minute talks (plus 5 minutes for questions) and lightning talks until 31st March 2017 at midnight. More information here.

Register your interest

Register your interest to attend.

Sponsorship opportunities

Sponsor our workshop and reach out to the research software community including researchers, developers and educators. Take a look at our fantastic sponsorship options.

Containers

Containers, specially Docker and Singularity, is the hottest topics at the moment for reproducible research. What impact does the use of containers have on research, how can researchers benefit from them and make their research more reproducible? The Software Sustainability Institute invites all members of the…

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Container ship.27th – 28th June, Cambridge (provisional date)

Containers, specially Docker, are the hottest topic at the moment for reproducible research. What impact does the use of containers have on research, how can researchers benefit from them and make their research more reproducible? The Software Sustainability Institute invites all members of the research software community to explore and discuss these and other questions at the Docker Containers for Reproducible Research Workshop from 27th to 28th June 2017 (date tbc) at Cambridge.

The Software Sustainability Institute’s Docker Containers for Reproducible Research Workshop will bring together researchers, developers, innovators and educators to explore best practices when using containers and the future of research software with containers. C4RR aims to gain insight into the topics of containers technologies and how these impact and will impact on research. It is also an ideal opportunity to form collaborations.

For further information and register interest, please visit the Docker Containers for Reproducible Research Workshop page.

By Robert Haines, Institute Fellow & Research Software Engineering Manager, IT Services, University of Manchester and Caroline Jay, Institute Fellow & Lecturer, School of Computer Science, University of Manchester.

As we move into a world where (hopefully) more and more people are trying to make their research as reproducible as possible, a lot of us are turning to Docker to help out with the task of distributing our research software in a way in which it is as accessible as possible to others. As we move in this direction we need to be able to cite the software environments that we are executing, not just the source code itself.

 

In the IDInteraction project we are working on tools that allow people to use object tracking over a video to create models of human behaviour - a technique known as 'behavioural coding'. This process was previously done manually, and so these tools could be very useful to others, but what is the best way to make them available? Ensuring our code is open source is an important first step, but this isn't optimal for a researcher who doesn't have the technical expertise (or time) to build the software from scratch. In the rest of this post we describe our approach to making research software easily available, by citing the…

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CloudsBy Mike Jackson, Software Architect.

We're helping EPCC and the Met Office promote the uptake, and ongoing development, of the Met Office NERC cloud (MONC) model within the atmospheric sciences community. We're assessing how easy it is to deploy MONC, helping set up a MONC virtual machine and advising on setting up resources for engaging with and supporting researchers.

At the Met Office weather and climate are predicted using numerical models, in particular, the Unified Model (UM). The UM is run on super-computers to produce high spatial resolution forecasts (1 km) for the UK. The details of forecasts are valuable for many public institutions and companies.

A vital tool for the development and testing of the UM is the Met Office Large Eddy simulation model (LEM). The LEM is used to simulate atmospheric phenomena, such as fog, clouds and deep convection at very high resolutions (10 to 100 s metres). The LEM was first developed in the early 90s and parallelised in the mid-1990s. While it can be argued that science undertaken with the LEM underpins many of the atmospheric parameterisations in the UM, the LEM can no longer capitalise on supercomputer enhancements, as the code structure and…

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Clouds We're helping EPCC and the Met Office promote the uptake, and ongoing development, of the Met Office NERC cloud (MONC) model within the atmospheric sciences community. We're assessing how easy it is to deploy MONC, helping set up a MONC virtual machine and advising on setting up resources for engaging with and supporting researchers.

Modelling clouds for weather forecasting

The UK Met Office uses software to create its weather forecasts. This software simulates the behaviour of weather using complex mathematical models. These models can use information about past weather to forecast future weather. The Met Office's best known weather model is the Unified Model (UM), which generates national and international forecasts down to a scale of 1 kilometre. The Met Office also has a number of other models that concentrate on specific aspects of weather. One of these is the Large Eddy Simulation model (LEM) which models clouds, atmospheric flows and turbulence.

The LEM has been developed over the past 30 years. But, it is now showing its age and LEM's performance does not significantly improve if run on more than 512 processes whereas many modern super-computers have tens of thousands of processors. A consequence of this limitation is that the UK atmospheric sciences community relies on…

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By Scott Edmunds, Executive Editor at GigaScience.

With greater awareness of the difficulties in making scientific research more reproducible, numerous technical fixes are being suggested to move publishing away from static and often not reproducible papers - which have changed little since the 17th century - to more reproducible digital objects that better fit 21st century technology. New research in the Open Access journal GigaScience demonstrates a potential approach through publishing open data and code in containerised form using Docker, and also allowing scientists to tackle another scourge of the 21st century – climate change, through better understanding of the production of biofuels.

One of the most promising areas in biofuel development is biogas, which has huge potential as a renewable and clean source of energy. Biogas is the production of methane gas through the anaerobic digestion (fermentation) of organic matter such as agricultural or food waste. Detailed knowledge on the functioning of the fermentation process is key for optimising this process. However, the vast majority of the microbes involved remain unknown and cannot be cultivated in laboratories.

In new research just published in GigaScience, researchers from Bielefeld University in Germany have now characterised the complex communities of micro-organisms in a biogas plant that generates heat and power from maize silage and pig manure. The authors made their research more…

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