University of Manchester

By Aleksandra Pawlik, Training Leader.

Last month saw us run a special Software Carpentry course for students undertaking the MSc in Clinical Bioinformatics course at the University of Manchester. This combines an academic curriculum with a work-based programme.

The students are already qualified professionals and based at various clinical units throughout the UK, with teaching take place during short, intense training sessions.

The instructors at the Software Carpentry workshop were the Institute’s Aleksandra Nenadic, who taught for the first time, and myself. We…

By Russell Garwood, 1851 Royal Commission Research Fellow at the School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Science, University of Manchester.

This article is part of our series: a day in the software life, in which we ask researchers from all disciplines to discuss the tools that make their research possible.

Palaeontology is often thought of as an antiquated field full of elderly researchers, but the discipline as it is today rarely matches this stereotype. Modern studies are multidisciplinary and use a diverse array of techniques to investigate the history…

Computational hardware is changing rapidly. Two decades ago, all we needed to know was the speed of upcoming hardware, not its form or the state of its software frameworks. This is no longer true with new and novel highly parallel computing architectures being unveiled all the time.

This flux forces significant questions about re-coding and future proofing existing scientific software. The term emerging technology is beginning to be used to describe this continual state of hardware change. Unique in its aims and scope, this event will bring together experts to examine how…

By Dr Bill Sellers, researcher at the Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester.

This article is part of our series, a day in the software life, in which we ask researchers from all disciplines to discuss the tools that make their research possible.

Making Dinosaurs move is fun. As anyone who's seen Jurassic Park will tell you, extinct megafauna is a sight to behold. That doesn't mean there is any scientific basis behind what we see at the movies. All too often, the animators produce something that they think looks credible, but this is hardly good science…

Subscribe to University of Manchester