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Digital Humanities, Oxford Summer School

Do you work in the humanities or support people who do? Are you interested in how digital techniques can help enhance your research?

The annual Digital Humanities at Oxford (DHOxSS) summer school runs this year from 3rd-7th July 2017 at various central Oxford venues, including St. Anne’s College, the Oxford e-Research Centre and IT Services. It offers training to anyone with an interest in the Digital Humanities, including academics at all career stages, students, project managers, and people who work in IT, libraries and cultural heritage.

Early bird prices are available until 30th April. Registration will close at midnight on 18th June. Please note that group discounts are available for groups of 10+, along with discounts for students.

Workshop strands for 2017 are:

  • An introduction to Digital Humanities – Expert insights into our digital landscape
  • An introduction to the Guidelines of the Text Encoding Initiative – Markup for textual research
  • Data Science for the Humanities – Exploring Machine Learning
  • Digital Musicology – Applied computational and informatics methods for enhancing musicology
  • From Text to Tech – Corpus and computational linguistics for powerful text processing in the Humanities
  • Humanities Data: a Hands-on Approach – Making the most of messy data
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ICT research EPSRC surveyThe Employment Research Institute at Edinburgh Napier University has been commissioned by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) to carry out a survey of staff and research postgraduates working or studying –presently or formerly–in disciplines that fall under EPSRC’s Information and Communications Technologies portfolio. 

Why do many women not continue a career in Computing/ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) research? What are the barriers faced by some minority groups, such as black and ethnic minorities, in pursuing a Computing/ICT research career? These are some of the questions included in this survey. EPSRC is investigating what the barriers are, how they manifest themselves and what can be done to support underrepresented groups in ICT. This starts with an an inclusive online survey across the whole ICT research community.

Take the survey before 28th February. 

 

 

DiversityBy Eilis Hannon, Research Fellow in Bioinformatics, in the Complex Disease Epigenetic Group at the University of Exeter.

This post summarises a discussion with Lawrence Hudson, Roberto Murcio, Penny Andrew and Robin Long as part of the Fellow Selection Day 2017.

The question of how to improve diversity is suitably broad and vague to initially induce silence in a group, but eventually, true to its name, it promotes a wide-ranging discussion. Sometimes the task is divided up to target particular under-represented groups, as it starts to become a bit of a minefield to develop a scheme that improves diversity in general. What opens the door to some parts of society can simultaneously close the doors to others. Hackathon events are a common and successful method of attracting young people to computer science; however, if they take place over the weekend and are marketed as providing beer and pizza for sustenance, you start to exclude anyone with caring responsibilities or discourage anyone who doesn’t drink.

Before we can think about trying to improve diversity, it is helpful to consider what exactly do we mean and what are the benefits…

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jisc logoJisc suggested data set for the CW17 Hackday team, you can still win even if you don't use them.

CORE’s mission is to aggregate all open access research outputs from repositories and journals worldwide and make them available to the public. In this way CORE facilitates free unrestricted access to research for all.

  • CORE is available as open data – (please check the license of the content in the dataset)

 

equipment.data is a catalogue of UK research equipment; allowing accessibility with the aim to stimulate collaboration.

 

SHERPA is investigating issues in the future of scholarly communication. It is developing open-access institutional repositories in universities to facilitate the rapid and efficient worldwide dissemination of research.
 

  • SHERPA REF public API - https://ref.sherpa.ac.uk/api (the data is CC BY-NC-SA licensed)

Other SHERPA services have APIs that are rate limited to 500 requests/day unless you register for an API key and like SHERPA REF their data is licensed CC BY-NC-SA…

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The Geisel Library, UC San DiegoFORCE11 (Future of Research Communications and E-Scholarship)—a global community of researchers, students, librarians, publishers, funders and scholars interested in the future of scholarship—is pleased to announce the launch of its new annual Summer Institute in Scholarly Communications: the Force 11 Scholarly Communications Institute at the University of California, San Diego (FSCI@UCSD), July 30th-August 4th, 2017.

FSCI@UCSD is a week-long program that offers participants training, networking and skills development in new modes of research communication. The UC San Diego Library is hosting the event that will take place at the Institute of the Americas on the UC San Diego Campus.

“The research community lacks a forum for coordinated access to training, skills development, and expert knowledge on new modes of research communication,” says Cameron Neylon, President of Force 11, “even as funders are mandating change and the wider world has embraced new forms of communication.”

Based on proven models in other disciplines, FSCI@UCSD will bring world-leading experts in different aspects of scholarly communication to San Diego to design and deliver courses that will help participants to navigate this new world. Courses will be established for all levels, from absolute beginners to experts. They will also be aimed…

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UCLThe UCL Research Software Development Group are recruiting research software developers. The Group was founded in 2012, was the first of its kind, and is one of the leading university-based research programming groups in the UK. They work across college developing high-quality software in collaboration with scientists, engineers and scholars from all research domains.

If the following describes you, then you should consider applying for one the vacancies below:

  • You have created and maintained software to address advanced research problems in one or more fields
  • You can rapidly assimilate understanding of new scientific questions, and quickly connect research needs to software requirements
  • You are committed to software development best practices, and know how to adapt these to research contexts
  • You are expert in one or more languages and platforms used for scientific computing, and are keen to expand your knowledge.

    Three research software developer posts are available. For detailed information, check this …

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    We would like to thank all of our sponsors for their kind and generous support.

    Platinum+ Sponsor

    Microsoft is CW17 primary sponsor. To hear more about what they are kindly bringing to the event see the announcement

    Microsoft logo

     

    Platinum Sponsors

    Advanced Research Computing - University of Leeds

    ARC provide a comprehensive Advanced Research Computing support service for researchers in all faculties at the University of Leeds. They are kindly offering local support for CW17 and venue sponsorship.

    arc-at-uni-of-leeds

    Silver Sponsors

    GitlabGitLab

    GitLab is the open core code collaboration platform that provides a complete workflow to code, test, and deploy simply and effectively.

     

     

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    Jupyter sprintBy Raniere Silva, Community Officer, Software Sustainability Institute

    On 16-20th January, the International Centre for Mathematical Sciences hosted the Computational Mathematics with Jupyter workshop organised jointly by the OpenDreamKit and CoDiMa projects where GAP, Singular, SageMath, Jupyter users and developers met for experience sharing talks and coding hackathons.

    In a previous blog post, we covered the talks during the Computational Mathematics with Jupyter workshop and in this post we will mention some of the achievements of the workshop attendees during the sprint. If you do a search on Wikipedia, "a sprint is a get-together of people involved in a project to further a focused development of the project", but at this sprint attendees worked on more than one project. Some people are sceptical about the value of sprints, but we hope that the Jupyter sprint helped…

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    CW17 at Leeds UniversityBy Shoaib Sufi, Community Lead

    Register for CW17—27-29 March 2017, University of Leeds.

    The Collaborations Workshop 2017 (CW17) #CollabW17 is set to be the best ever!  It’s set to be quite an event with charismatic and knowledgeable keynotes, generous sponsors, fantastic mini-workshops, and the opportunities to learn, engage and benefit are plenty! The focus of the workshop is the Internet of Things (IoT) and Open Data: implications for research. The schedule will also allow time for other sustainability related topics including reproducible research, training, career path discussions and cloud for research. So there will be something for everyone!

    We are proud to announce that our primary sponsor this year is Microsoft, who have very kindly offered free IoT kits and Cloud time to the first 100 to register There will be a talk about the work at Microsoft in this space and an announcement around bidding for free cloud time from Azure. There will also be plenty of time to learn how to setup and use the IoT device at a mini-workshop session, and we encourage (but don’t require) you to use your device in the Hackday competition.

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    DifferenceBy Daniel S. Katz, Assistant Director for Scientific Software and Applications at NCSA

    Reposted with the author's permission. This article was originally published in Daniel S. Katz's blog

    This blog is based on part of a talk I gave in January 2017, and the thinking behind it, in turn, is based on my view of a series of recent talks and blogs, and how they might be fit together. The short summary is that general software reproducibly is hard at best, and may not be practical except in special cases.

    Software reproducibility here means the ability for someone to replicate a computational experiment that was done by someone else, using the same software and data, and then to be able to change part of it (the software and/or the data) to better understand the experiment and its bounds.

    I’m borrowing from Carole Goble (slide 12), who defines:

    • Repeat: the same lab runs the same experiment with the same set up
    • Replicate: an independent lab runs the same experiment with the same set up
    • Reproduce: an independent lab varies the…
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