Training

Jisc, in collaboration with Software Sustainability Institute, University of Cambridge, University of Sheffield, University of Bath, University of Leicester, University of Birmingham, the British Library and STFC are organising a number of workshops in January specifically for researchers that would like to know how to better manage their research software, or have real issues and would like some expert help.

The workshops are happening in the following locations:

  • University of Birmingham, 9 January — speakers include Mike Croucher (Research Software Engineer)
  • London, the British Library, 12 January — speakers include Neil Chue Hong (SSI)
  • University of Cambridge, 16 January — speakers include Neil Chue Hong (SSI), Stephen Eglen, Kirstie Whitaker and Laurent Gatto (University of Cambridge)
  • University of Leicester, 19 January — facilitators include Jonathan Tedds, Grant Denkinson, Jon Wakelin (University of Leicester)
  • Engine Shed, Bristol Temple Meads, 20 January
  • University of Sheffield, 25 January — speakers include Mike Croucher (Research Software Engineer), Prof Eleni Vasilaki (University of Sheffield), facilitators include Jez Cope (University of Sheffield)

Register for one of the workshops at our event page.

Photo of inflatable Santa by Bart FieldsEveryone at the Software Sustainability Institute would like to wish our friends and colleagues all the best for the holiday season.

After a busy year, including the first Conference of Research Software Engineers, the announcement of a wonderful new set of Fellows, and even more eventsSoftware and Data Carpentry workshops, and Open Call projects, we need a little break to get ready for everything we've planned in 2017. So please excuse us while we switch off our email from the 23rd December to the 2nd January, and enjoy the festive season (responsibly)!

Alexander Konovalov, Software Sustainability Institute fellow, helped organise and deliver the Second CoDiMa training school in Discrete Computational Mathematics, from 17th to 21st October 2016 in Edinburgh. Hosted at the International Centre for Mathematical Sciences, 26 learners representing 11 institutions from around the UK attended the event. The majority of attendees were PhD students in mathematics and computer science. The training was delivered by Christopher Jefferson, Alexander Konovalov , Steve Linton, Markus Pfeiffer and Wilf Wilson.

Read the full article at the CODIMA.

Old map of the worldBy Aleksandra Nenadic, Training Lead

Say you've got a Google spreadsheet with a column for addresses. It could be street addresses or postcodes. You want to map this data and embed the map into a website. Maybe you also want the map to update dynamically as more rows are added to the spreadsheet. What are your options?

This guide goes through the different ways to do this. However, to first map the data you’ll need to find the geocodes; i.e., latitude and longitude coordinates for these addresses. For locations that are more general, such as “UK”, geocoding APIs usually return the coordinates of the centroid—the area’s center point—or the capital.

Using Google My Maps

Google My Maps is a powerful tool designed to easily create custom maps from your data and share and publish maps online. You don’t need to worry about geocodes—they will be calculated for you out of addresses and postcodes.

To use this tool, you’ll need a Google account and you can either load data from a CSV, XSLX, KML or GPX file or link your Google spreadsheet (making sure it is either publicly available via "File" > "Publish to the web..." option in Google Spreadsheets or you have created a special sharing link for it).

Continue Reading

The Software Sustainability Institute, ELIXIR UK and the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Oxford are jointly organising a Bioinformatics Software Carpentry workshop in NGS data analysis. 

The workshop will be held at the Medical Sciences Teaching Center (MSTC) over 3 days, 5th-7th December 2016. The first two days will cover the standard Software Carpentry curriculum (introduction to the UNIX shell, GitHub as well as programming and data visualisation in R). The third day will involve hands-on next generation sequencing (NGS) data analysis in R. The aim is to make the course accessible to beginners, however some prior bioinformatics knowledge/skills will be an advantage. 

Please visit the workshop page for further information. The workshop is completely booked. However, if you are interested in attending, please get in touch with Aleksandra Nenadic in the case there are some cancellations and late availability.

Library CarpentryWhat is Library Carpentry?

Library Carpentry introduces librarians to the fundamentals of computing and provides them with a platform for further self-directed learning, based on similar initiatives Software Carpentry and Data Carpentry.

Library Carpentry is made by librarians, for librarians to help them:

  • automate repetitive, boring, error-prone tasks

  • create, maintain and analyse sustainable and reusable data

  • work effectively with IT and systems colleagues

  • better understand the use of software in research

  • and much more…

How it started?

Library Carpentry was started by James Baker, Software Sustainability Institute Fellow 2015. James used his Fellowship funds to launch initial Library Carpentry workshops, which attracted 59 participants from 14 institutions in London and reached 200-250 librarians. Since then, a number of workshops have run in various countries across four continents.

Find out more about the Library Carpentry activities.

 

There are still some places left at the Data Carpentry for Social Scientists and Humanities workshop organised by the SSI Fellow 2016 Heather Ford at the University of Leeds on 21-22 November 2016. 

This two-day event is aimed at researchers in the social sciences, humanities and other disciplines who want to learn how to use popular tools for data cleaning, management and visualisation in a hands-on, interactive workshop. 

James Baker accepts British Library Labs awardLibrary Carpentry (lead by the James Baker, Software Sustainability Institute Fellow 2015) wins the British Library Labs 2016 award for Teaching and Learning on 7th November 2016.

James is using the award fund to run even more Library Carpentry workshops (see the Library Carpentry workshop call).

What is Library Carpentry?

Library Carpentry is made by librarians, for librarians to help you:

  • automate repetitive, boring, error-prone tasks
  • create, maintain and analyse sustainable and reusable data
  • work effectively with IT and systems colleagues
  • better understand the use of software in research
  • and much more…

Library Carpentry introduces you to the fundamentals of computing and provides you with a platform for further self-directed learning. Find out more about Library Carpentry activities.

British Library Labs Awards 2016

The annual BL Labs Awards, introduced in 2015, recognises outstanding and innovative work that has been carried out using the British Library’s digital collections and data. This year, they commend work…

Continue Reading

Instructor TrainingBy Steve Crouch, Software Sustainability Institute, with Karin Lagesen, University of Oslo, and Laurent Gatto, University of Cambridge.

Last month, we held a Software and Data Carpentry Instructor Training workshop at the University of Cambridge, sponsored by the R Consortium. The demand for Carpentry events in the UK, and trained instructors to facilitate them, has always been very high, and I found this to be a very enjoyable event to increase the instructor pool in the UK.

The main organiser of the event was Laurent Gatto, a Software Sustainability Institute Fellow who has delivered numerous Carpentry courses since becoming a certified instructor in 2014. We also had the able helping hands of Paul Judge and Gabriella Rustici from the University of Cambridge Bioinformatics Training facility, who assisted greatly with the event and helped us make great use of the sophisticated presentation systems present in the training room.

The workshop was held on 19th and 20th of September, with myself and Karin Lagesen as instructors. We were delighted with the very high level of engagement from the 25 trainees - this was very much the kind of group we hope…

Continue Reading

In collaboration with Software Sustainability Institute, ARCHER are running a Data Carpentry two-day workshop on November 2nd & 3rd, 2016. ARCHER, the UK's national supercomputing service, offers training in software development and high-performance computing to scientists and researchers across the UK.

Who: The course is aimed at graduate students and other researchers.

Where: James Clerk Maxwell Building, Peter Guthrie Tait Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3FD. Requirements: Participants must bring a laptop with a Mac, Linux, or Windows operating sytem (not a tablet, Chromebook, etc.) that they have administrative privileges on.

The workshop will cover Data organization in spreadsheets and OpenRefine, Introduction to R, Data analysis and visualization in R and SQL for data management. Participants should bring their laptops and plan to participate actively. By the end of the workshop learners should be able to more effectively manage and analyze data and be able to apply the tools and approaches directly to their ongoing research.

Requirements

Attendees should have a few specific software packages installed (listed below). They are also required to abide by Data Carpentry's Code of Conduct.Further information and registration

To register, please visit the ARCHER training page.

For further information and requirements, please visit the…

Continue Reading
Subscribe to Training