Neil Chue Hong

Are you working on a research software project, and would like to develop and scale your work? Would you like to create a business plan, understand cybersecurity, and learn about alternative funding models?

The SGCI are running an intensive workshop for leaders of research software projects, science gateways and virtual research environments (VREs) in Edinburgh on the 11-12 June 2018, immediately before IWSG2018. Participants will engage in hands-on activities to help them articulate the value of their work to key stakeholders and to create a strong development, operations, and sustainability plan. Workshop participants will work closely with one another and, as a result, have the opportunity to network and establish relationships with people who are engaging in similar activities.

Participants will learn:

  • Core business strategy skills as they apply to leading an online digital presence, such as understanding stakeholder and user needs; business, operations, finance, and resource planning; and project management;

  • Technology best practices, including the principles of cybersecurity; software architecture, development practices, and tools that ensure implementation of strong software engineering methods; usability do’s and don’ts; and

  • Long-term sustainability strategies, such as alternative funding models; case studies of successful gateway efforts; licensing choices and their impact on sustainability; planning for and measuring your impact.

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38523074811_210bcc3ed4_z.jpgBy Christopher Brown, Senior co-design manager, Jisc, Neil Chue Hong, Director, The Software Sustainability Institute, and Mike Jackson, Software Architect, The Software Sustainability Institute

On the 7th March, Jisc and the Software Sustainability Institute ran a Software Deposit and Preservation Policy and Planning Workshop at Jisc’s Brettenham House in London. This is part of an activity, funded by Jisc, to provide software deposit and preservation guidance, in particular to develop use cases and workflows for software deposit via Jisc's Research Data Shared Service (RDSS).

Our 17 attendees were members of Jisc's RDSS pilot institutions, research data managers and research software engineers—all sharing an interest in the archiving and preservation of research software.

Chris gave an introduction to the RDSS and Neil introduced the Institute's activity on software deposit. Mike presented workflows for software deposit, derived from current implementations including the Figshare-GitHub integration, the…

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Regular Institute collaborator Dr. Jeffrey Carver of the University of Alabama is conducting a couple of studies relating to the way that people develop research software. These will help provide the community with a better understanding of how different practices, including code review and software metrics are being used in the development of research software.

If you'd like to provide input into these studies, please participate in the following web surveys (each of which will take approximately 15 minutes to complete): 

Code review survey (in conjunction with Nasir Eisty of the University of Alabama) : https://universityofalabama.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bBdeMr08ix8YbXL

Software metrics survey (in conjunction with Dr. George Thiruvathukal from Loyola University-Chicago): https://universityofalabama.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_darjzw2JlY3OXY1

 

Your participation is completely anonymous and voluntary.  You are free not to participate or stop participating any time before you submit your answers. Both research studies have been approved by the University of Alabama Institutional Review Board.

 

Citation neededBy Stephan Druskat, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Radovan Bast, University of Tromsø, Neil Chue Hong, Software Sustainability Institute, University of Edinburgh, Alexander Konovalov, University of St Andrews, Andrew Rowley, University of Manchester, and Raniere Silva, Software Sustainability Institute, University of Manchester

The citation of research software has a number of purposes, most importantly attribution and credit, but also the provision of impact metrics for funding proposals, job interviews, etc. Stringent software citation practices, as proposed by Katz et al. [1], therefore include the citation of a software version itself, rather than a paper about the software. Direct software citation also enables reproducibility of research results as the exact version can be retrieved from the citation. Unique digital object identifiers (DOIs) for software versions can already be reserved via providers such as Zenodo or figshare, but disseminating (and finding) citation information for software is still difficult…

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The ICT4S conferences bring together leading researchers in ICT for Sustainability with government and industry representatives, including decision-makers with an interest in using ICT for sustainability, researchers focusing on ICT effects on sustainability and developers of sustainable ICT systems or applications.

The theme of the 2018 conference, to be held on May 14-18, 2018 in Toronto, is “Thriving Communities”. The transformational power of ICT is essential to put our society on the path to sustainability. This potential could embrace all levels, from individuals to communities, from public sector to all industry sectors, from business goals to social aspirations and environmental objectives. ICT can bring people together to build thriving, resilient communities.

Papers relating to ICT for sustainability in a broad sense and papers developing this year’s theme (and beyond) are welcome, along with workshop proposals of traditional or unconventional formats for half-day or full-day workshops and submissions of high-quality extended abstracts for posters presenting late-breaking research or work in progress. Instructions for all types of submissions can also be found at the conference website.

Important Dates

Workshop proposals
Proposal submission deadline: Oct 15 2017
Proposal acceptance notification: Oct 22 2017

Paper & Journals First submissions
Abstracts deadline: Nov 7 2017
Full papers deadline: Nov 15 2017
Paper acceptance notification: Feb 1 2018
Camera-ready deadline: Mar 1 2018

Posters

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We are pleased to announce the awardees from the final round of the EPSRC USA-UK Research Software Engineer Travel fund applications. This funding aims to encourage greater collaboration between the UK and USA-based Research Software Engineer communities to help with: investigating emerging hardware and the impact on software; building collaboration around a particular science area; developing common community codes; and building links between computational / computer science and mathematics.

We have now closed applications for this funding.

Awardees

Alys Brett

Alys Brett, on behalf of the UK RSE association’s RSE Leaders group, has been awarded money to enable USA RSE group leaders to travel to take part in the two-day International RSE leaders meeting in London at the Alan Turing Institute in early 2018. Alys Brett is Head of Software Development Group at the UK Atomic Energy Authority and will be organising the meeting and site visits to UK RSE groups along with other applicants from the RSE Leaders group including Robert Haines (Manchester), James Hetherington (UCL), Simon Hettrick (Southampton), Mark Turner (Newcastle), Chris Woods (Bristol) and Claire Wyatt (RSE Community Coordinator).

Filippo Spiga

The University of Cambridge group led by Filippo Spiga, in collaboration with Jeffrey Salmond and Krishna Kumar, has been awarded money from the EPSRC RSE Travel fund to facilitate the visit of Christian Trott and H. Carter Edwards, main developers and contributors of Kokkos C++. Both software sustainability and performance portability are…

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Understanding how to choose a piece of software is difficult. What code should I bet my research on? Will the project producing the software grow or shrink? Is the code base stable or changing? Does the project depend on one organisation or many? Is the community healthy or hopelessly ill?

At the Software Sustainability Institute, we want to ensure that research software is sustainable. One of the ways we can do this is by measuring the general health of the community around the software and developing methodologies and tools for analysing modern software development. With this in place, we can improve the health of projects and make it easier to answer the questions above.

We are therefore delighted that the Software Sustainability Institute is a founding partner in the Community Health Analytics Open Source Software project (CHAOSS). CHAOSS is a new Linux Foundation project focused on creating the analytics and metrics to help define community health that was officially launched this week.

The aims of the project are to:

  • Establish standard implementation-agnostic metrics for measuring software community activity, contributions, and health, which are objective and repeatable.
  • Produce integrated open source software for analyzing software community development.

Other members contributing to the project include Bitergia, Eclipse Foundation, Jono Bacon Consulting, Laval University (Canada),…

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We are pleased to announce the next awardees from the EPSRC USA-UK Research Software Engineer Travel fund. This funding aims to encourage greater collaboration between the UK and USA-based Research Software Engineer communities to help with: investigating emerging hardware and the impact on software; building collaboration around a particular science area; developing common community codes; and building links between computational / computer science and mathematics. The deadline for the next round of the fund is 1st September.

Awardees

A consortium led by Dr James Hetherington, Head of the Research Software Development Group at UCL and Head of Research Engineering at the Alan Turing Institute, comprising the five Alan Turing Institute partners (UCL, University of Cambridge, University of Edinburgh, University of Oxford, and University of Warwick) has been awarded money to help establish an ongoing exchange program with the three US Moore-Sloan Data Science Environments at University of California Berkeley, New York University and the University of Washington. The funding will help to bring across leading data scientists / RSEs including Dr Ariel Rokem, Dr Claudio Silva, Dr Jacob VanderPlas, and Dr Stéfan van der Walt, for an un-conference event hosted at the ATI to identify collaborations and visits to partner sites.

Dr David Henty, group manager at EPCC at the University of Edinburgh, has been awarded money to support the visit of Dr Elsa…

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RCUK are conducting a survey to understand the skills and training needs of researchers using UK computational research resources, including traditional HPC for simulations and modelling to high throughput and data-intensive science applications. If your work is supported by a non-desktop system then this survey applies to you!

The data will be used to understand the range of skills across the UK HPC community, and the training needed to fill those skills gaps. The survey will take no more than 10 minutes to complete and closes on 1st September 2017.

Take the survey.

We are pleased to announce the first two awardees from the EPSRC USA-UK Research Software Engineer Travel fund. This funding aims to encourage greater collaboration between the UK and USA-based Research Software Engineer communities to help with: investigating emerging hardware and the impact on software; building collaboration around a particular science area; developing common community codes; and building links between computational / computer science and mathematics. The deadline for the next round of the fund is 1st August.

Awardees

Dr Chris Richardson, EPSRC Research Software Engineering Fellow at the University of Cambridge BP Institute and core developer of the FEnICS software environment for finite element analysis, has been awarded money to enable the visit to the UK of Greg von Winckel, the developer of the ROL optimisation library based at Sandia National Labs. Greg will give seminars in Oxford and Cambridge to share knowledge of the current capabilities of the underlying ROL library and work with Chris and his team on code sprints to develop PyROL, a Python interface to ROL that will enable integration with FEnICS and other codes.

Dr Martin Turner, currently Relationship Manager in the University of Manchester, has had related overlapping secondments being Visualisation Director for the Harwell Imaging Partnership (HIP) at STFC/RAL and Visualisation Group Leader within the Scientific Computing Division in STFC/DL, has been awarded money to support the visit of Marcus D. Hanwell, Technical Leader at Kitware, and lead for the…

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