Neil Chue Hong

“The near-ubiquity of software [in research] means that it is not possible to disentangle the quality of the software from the quality of the research.

With All Hallows Eve upon us once more, as the souls of the dead come to haunt us, it’s time to recount terrifying tales and scary stories… about software. You might think that research software is safe from such gruesome goings-on but you would be wrong, for there are many undead projects out to devour us.
By Neil Chue Hong, founding Director and Principal Investigator of the Software Sustainability Institute Why do open source research software projects appear to have a low rate of success? Is it because we lack appropriate models for sustaining research software development or is it because the community isn’t seeing the results?
The inaugural Open Publishing Awards celebrate all things Open in publishing, and are being implemented by Coko. Nominations are currently being sought in two categories: Open Source Software and Open Content.
Last call for papers - deadline 16 August! The Software Sustainability Institute is co-organising a workshop on Software Engineering for HPC-Enabled Research at Supercomputing 2019 in Denver.
By Daniel S. Katz, Daina Bouquin and Neil Chue Hong. This blog post was originally published in Daniel S. Katz's blog. Identification of software is essential to a number of important issues, such as citation, provenance, and reproducibility. Here, we are focusing on issues related to citation. Identification can be thought of as a subset of naming. Some important questions are therefore: How do we name things? How do we know how things are named? And who gets to name things?

Are you working on a research software project, and would like to develop and scale your work? Would you like to create a business plan, understand cybersecurity, and learn about alternative funding models?

By Christopher Brown, Senior co-design manager, Jisc, Neil Chue Hong, Director, The Software Sustainability Institute, and Mike Jackson, Software Architect, The Software Sus

Regular Institute collaborator Dr. Jeffrey Carver of the University of Alabama is conducting a couple of studies relating to the way that people develop research software. These will help provide the community with a better understanding of how different practices, including code review and software metrics are being used in the development of research software.

If you'd like to provide input into these studies, please participate in the following web surveys (each of which will take approximately 15 minutes to complete): 

The citation of research software has a number of purposes, most importantly attribution and credit, but also the provision of impact metrics for funding proposals, job interviews, etc.
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