Selina Aragon

Today, we’ll be hosting a Launch Webinar online where Raniere Silva, our Community Officer, will talk about the Programme, and Nikoleta Glynatsi, Gary Leeming, David Perez-Suarez, Iza A. Romanowska and Melody Sandells will share their experiences as Institute Fellows. This will be a great opportunity to ask questions or get further information.

The webinar will start at 2.00pm BST and to take part you just need to connect to our YouTube event.

The Institute's Fellowship programme funds researchers in exchange for their expertise and advice.

The main goals of the Programme are gathering intelligence about research and software from all disciplines, encouraging Fellows to develop their interests in the area of software sustainability (especially in their areas of research) and aid them as ambassadors of good software practice in their domains. 

For further information, please visit the Fellowship Programme page and the FAQ, which include details about eligibility.

Research Software Engineer

James is a Research Software Engineer at the Software Sustainability Institute.  He received an MChem in Chemistry for Drug Discovery from the University of Bath, before joining the Institute for Complex Systems Simulation PhD programme in 2013. He joined the SSI in September of 2017.

During his PhD studies James worked on a number of software projects, including the Monte-Carlo simulation package ProtoMS.  ProtoMS was successful in an SSI Open Call and received assistance in developing a test suite to ensure correctness of the core Fortran component.  His role in this project was in further development of the test suite, both code and infrastructure, and in ensuring the reproducibility of simulation across a range of platforms and compilers.
 

The National Archives are looking for a Head of Digital and Technology Research position in Richmond, Surrey.

The National Archives has set itself the ambition of becoming a digital archive by instinct and design. The digital strategy takes this forward through the notion of a disruptive archive which positively reimagines established archival practice, and develops new ways of solving core digital challenges. In relation to digital preservation of the public record, our challenges are not only about capturing and storing complex data, digital objects and systems, but also about making these accessible and exploitable.

Full details at Head of Digital and Technology Research job advert.

Are you passionate about data sharing and moving research forward? DataCite are looking for an application developer to join their team. The ideal candidate has experience writing open source software and a basic understanding of scholarly communication infrastructure.

DataCite is based in Hannover, Germany, but the position is suited for remote work from other places in Germany or other countries in Europe. Travel to meet with DataCite members and other partners is expected. The position includes work for projects funded by the European Commission and other funders.

For more information, please see the vacancy details.

Collaborations Workshop 2017 in LeedsBy Selina Aragon, Communications Officer, and Shoaib Sufi, Community Lead

The Software Sustainability Institute community team invites everyone to read the Collaborations Workshop 2017 report detailing each session’s content and the value provided to the attendees. CW17 took place at the Leeds Business School, University of Leeds, from 27th to 29th March 2017. The theme was the Internet of Things and Open Data: implications for research.

Read the full report.

How people rated CW17

This year we asked attendees to rate CW17 compared to the events they had attended in the past 12 months. 70% of those responding who were not staff and who had attended four or more events in the previous 12 months said that CW17 was the best or second best event they’d attended (over 50% said it was the best).

On average, attendees met ten new people at CW17 and, at the time, they intended to start two new collaborations. During the opening of the workshop, participants were encouraged to speak to at least seven people they didn't know. As usual, people found the workshop both enjoyable (4.6/5) and useful (4.3/5). 80 people attended the workshop and 30 filled in the…

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The Department of Parasitology is seeking a Software Engineer to investigate the impact of drug and insecticide resistance on Malaria Control and elimination programmes using the Open Malaria simulation package. As considerable resources are being invested in this direction, optimal use of these resources can be guided by appropriate computer simulations. We use modern computational power to simulate the entire process of malaria transmission and its impact on human health, burden on local health services, and cost-effectiveness of proposed control interventions using the OpenMalaria simulation platform developed over the last 12 years at the Swiss Tropical and Public Institute in Basel. The Research Software Engineer will be running the Openmalaria simulations and collating the output data in meaningful formats. These data will form part of reports and publications and hence, it is important that the simulation output data are well documented. The jobholder will also update the code as and when new factors are identified during the research. The role entails providing support for other simulation runs in collaboration with our colleagues at Swiss TPH which may require periodic, short visits to Basle  (<1 week duration).

The Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) is an internationally recognised centre of excellence for research in tropical diseases.  Through the creation of effective links with governments, organisations and institutions and by responding to the health needs of communities, LSTM aims to promote improved health, particularly for people of the less developed/resource poorest countries in the tropics and sub-tropics.

To be successful in this role, it is…

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MONC By Selina Aragon, Communications Officer, in conversation with Adrian Hill, Met Office

This article is part of our series: Breaking Software Barriers, in which we investigate how our Research Software Group has helped projects improve their research software. If you would like help with your software, get in touch.

Adrian Hill, the project’s primary contact, talked to us about the usefulness of the Institute’s collaboration with the Met Office and EPCC to promote the uptake and development of MONC. Adrian especially highlighted the invaluable help he received from Mike Jackson, Research Software Engineer, in setting up the basis for what has progressed into successful software with unexpected benefits and long-term value, used by researchers as well as PhD and masters' students.

Collaborative efforts

In collaboration with EPCC (Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre) and the Met Office, the Institute provided help to rewrite the Large Eddy simulation model (LEM) as its successor, the Met Office NERC cloud (MONC). MONC is a complete re-engineering of LEM, which preserves LEM's underlying science. MONC has been developed to provide a flexible community model that can exploit modern supercomputers…

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The Research Software Group and the Software Sustainability have organised a Data Carpentry workshop, which will take place on 1st & 2nd August 2017 at the University of Southampton.

The course will cover data organisation in spreadsheets and OpenRefine, SQL for data management, and an introduction to R for data analysis. By the end of the workshop, learners will be able to more effectively analyse and manage their data to aid reproducibilty and  to increase their chances of furthering their research.

For further information and registration, please visit the event page.

Data Carpentry is an international movement to teach researchers better software skills. For more information about Data Carpentry, visit their website.

Steve Harris' article "Data Science for Docs" was recently published as the guest editorial in Bulletin, July 2017, the magazine for members of the National College of Anaesthetics, which reaches every anaesthetist in the UK (largest hospital speciality). 

You can find the article on pages 12 and 13 of Bulletin, Issue 104.

Dr Daniel S. Katz will talk at a Helmholtz Open Science Webinar in August about "Using citation to provide credit for software contributions". Most research today in many fields is dependent on software, but academic culture does not reward development, support, and maintenance of that software. A potential method to provide such credit is to insert software into the current publication/citation system. This talk will discuss an effort that is underway to do this, the FORCE11 Software Citation Implementation working group.

The webinar will take place on Wednesday, 9 August 2017, 3 to 3.30 pm CEST with a rerun on 
Monday, 14 August 2017, 3 to 3.30 pm CEST.

Registration: There isn't any registration required. Please go to the instructions page for details on how to access the webinars.

After the talk, there will be time to chat with the speaker for questions. Please have a look at the webinar details for further information.

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