Research Software Camps

The Software Sustainability Institute’s (SSI) Research Software Camp on research accessibility took place from 21 February to 5 March 2021. In this post, we will share how we used relevant sections of the SSI Event Organisation Guide to plan, organise, and deliver the Camp.
Do you use spreadsheets to conduct your research? Have you recently started coding or want to learn? Would you like some help from a dedicated trainer? We’d like to hear from you!
The Software Sustainability Institute is delighted to announce that the autumn Research Software Camp: Beyond the Spreadsheet will focus on the uses of spreadsheets in research and first steps into further use of software in research.

Do you use spreadsheets to conduct your research? Do you prefer a specific tool or approach when using spreadsheets? The Research Software Camp: Beyond the Spreadsheet will focus on the uses of spreadsheets in research and first steps into further use of software in research. The Camp will run for two weeks from 1st to 12th November 2021.

See the main website for the event.

The Software Sustainability Institute will be running the autumn edition of our Research Software Camp from 1 to 12 November 2021. The topic will be announced soon.
It’s the end of the second and final week of our inaugural Research Software Camp, which has focussed on different aspects of research accessibility. Read some of the highlights from week two.
We think research reproducibility is super important! Reproducible research is necessary to ensure scientific outputs can be trusted and built upon in future work.  An important aspect of reproducible research is computational reproducibility. Binder is a great tool to help you do this easily. Here we offer some top tips so you can make the most out of Binder.
Yo Yehudi, Kaitlin Stack Whitney and Malvika Sharan describe how to structure online group calls for successful, multimodal collaboration among people who communicate in different ways.
You've decided to make the leap and share your research data. You might do this to improve the transparency of your study, allowing others to reproduce the work. Or you want to set up new collaborations or allow others to build further on your research, speeding up scientific discovery. You may also want to obtain credit or visibility for all the work that you put into collecting and curating the data. Or you may simply want to share your data because others require your research outputs to be made publicly available to receive funding or to be published. 
It’s the end of the first week of our inaugural Research Software Camp which is focussed on different aspects of research accessibility. We’ve been exploring the topic through a mixture of live sessions, guides on our website and discussions on social media. Here are some of the highlights from week one.
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